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Willem Breuker

Andrey Henkin By

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Willem Breuker's music is an experience—part circus, part orchestra, part theater. The man himself is no less complex and some of his thoughts on being a musician bely his humour and good nature. At Joe's Pub this month with his long-standing Kollektief, Breuker spoke with All About Jazz.

All About Jazz: Let's start at the beginning.

Willem Breuker: I always wanted to play the piano but after the second world war Holland was a very poor country like all Western Europe. It was not possible to buy a piano so I got a clarinet. I had some lessons and later I tried to go to the music high school and was refused because they said I had no talent for music. But I always wanted to make music; that was my first thing in my life. I listened to a lot of music though I was more interested in improvising than playing charts from a book or playing notes or things that other people had done before—to study an instrument the way they want me to do it. I was more into the result I could make myself. I learned to play the saxophone myself. I could read notes very well; I don't know why, it was just easy or a logical thing to me and I played in an orchestra in the surroundings of Amsterdam. They put me on bass clarinet because no one wanted to play on the bass clarinet...if you go out onto the streets for marches, you cannot play on the bass clarinet so you need a saxophone so they gave me a tenor saxophone and then in the meantime I bought myself an alto saxophone and in the weekends in the normal high school I changed my clarinet with a guy who had a soprano saxophone. So that was just the way I learned to play on the instruments.

And at the same time I tried to write down my musical ideas. I bought myself a fifth-rate piano, a very old thing, and I tried to compose the beginning it was very hard, no one really understood what I was doing. Still, nowadays, a lot of people don't know what I'm doing but that's another question.

I had my own groups, trio, quartets; it was very hard to find people so most of the time when I was doing something I wrote down notes for classical musicians so they didn't have to improvise, they just had to play. I always went to competitions where different new jazz groups showed up. And then there was a jury and they listened to you. Most of the time, it became a scandal when I was there, because I was playing something completely different than what the other guys were doing....I immediately had a name in Holland and I found more people to play with. I found drummers like, for example, Pierre Courbois or later Han Bennink and I found Misha Mengelberg. They were still playing at that time bebop music, Han and Misha, kind of post bebop music so we set up a trio and after a while Gunter Hampel, the German vibraphonist and flutist, invited me to join his band because he heard me play. And then I played in Germany very often and then I met through [Albert] Mangelsdorff, [Peter] Br'tzmann and all the guys. That was '66-67 when it all started so it immediately became my profession. What I always had in mind, I succeeded in that.

AAJ: So you were always a multi-instrumentalist.

WB: I never worked on instruments. I never study instruments because I hate instruments actually. I have no family affair or no connection with instruments. The instrument has to work and that's all I have with it. I say sleep well after a concert, put it in the case until next time. I have nothing with instruments; I have more with thinking about music or producing music or writing music or performing music or whatever. But just the link with the instrument is not there.

AAJ: You don't want to be thought of as "tenor saxophonist" Willem Breuker.

WB: If someone asked me to play the tenor saxophone I will do that. By accident I am playing the soprano saxophone in the Kollektief because no one wants to play the soprano. It is the higher part and the soprano saxophone is a lousy instrument because it is always out of tune, you can't control it very well. So the other guys prefer to play the tenor saxophone and the lady the alto saxophone. But that's the section so sometimes I play the alto or tenor or bass clarinet or whatever. I don't care at all. Mostly soprano, but just by accident not because I want to play soprano.

AAJ: If you don't associate yourself with an instrument, did anybody influence you?


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