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MUSICIAN Born:

Sheila Jordan

Sheila Jeanette Dawson, 18 November 1928, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Raised in poverty in Pennsylvania’s coal-mining country, Jordan began singing as a child and by the time she was in her early teens was working semi-professionally in Detroit clubs. Her first great influence was Charlie Parker and, indeed, most of her influences have been instrumentalists rather than singers. Working chiefly with black musicians, she met with disapproval from the white community but persisted with her career. She was a member of a vocal trio, Skeeter, Mitch And Jean (she was Jean), who sang versions of Parker’s solos in a manner akin to that of the later Lambert, Hendricks And Ross

Ode to the Road

Label: HighNote Records
Released: 2020
Track listing: Ode to the Road; Nothing Like You; Don’t Ask Why; All God’s Chillun Got Rhythm / Little Willie Leaps; That Second Look; Small Day Tomorrow; The Way We Were; Cross Me Off Your List; I Have the Feeling I’ve Been Here Before; A Tip of the Hat; The Days of Wine and Roses.

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Dena Derose: Keeper Of The Song

Read "Dena Derose: Keeper Of The Song" reviewed by R.J. DeLuke

Dena DeRose has established a reputation as one of the finest jazz singers today—though never exclusively that. As others have done—Shirley Horn, a predecessor, or Karrin Allyson, a contemporary, among others—DeRose, in addition to her alluring voice, is a highly accomplished pianist who accompanies herself. Often that's in a trio setting, but she easily extends it ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Nothing Like You - A Birthday Shoutout to Dorothy Parker

Read "Nothing Like You - A Birthday Shoutout to Dorothy Parker" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin

This week we feature new releases from trumpeter Eddie Henderson, vocalist Allegra Levy, trombonist Emily Asher's Garden Party and drummer John Hollenbeck with birthday shoutouts to Dorothy Parker (pictured), Carolyn Leigh, Adrienne Fenemor, Dinah Washington, Charlie Parker (100!), Alice Coltrane, Cecile McLorin Salvant, Mimi Fox and more. Thanks for listening and please support the artists you ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Dena DeRose: Ode to the Road

Read "Ode to the Road" reviewed by Jack Bowers

To those who may have wondered what ever happened to singer / pianist Dena DeRose, the answer is nothing—and everything. DeRose has lived for the last fifteen years in Graz, Austria, where she is professor of jazz voice at the University of Music and the Performing Arts. She still tours frequently, sometimes returning “home" to the ...

MUSICIAN Born:

Mark Murphy

The following is based on the book This is Hip: the Life of Mark Murphy by {{m: Peter Jones = 58082}} (Equinox Publishing, 2018). All rights reserved. In the opinion of many, {{m: Mark Murphy = 9692}} was the greatest jazz singer who ever lived. Quite a statement, but one that can be made to stand up pretty well in court. There have, of course, been more successful jazz singers; certainly more popular jazz singers. But not one of them has possessed the sheer range of abilities that Murphy was blessed with. He had a natural “instrument” at his disposal, a rich, masculine tone that could shape any jazz standard as beautifully as you were ever likely to hear it

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

John Scofield: Swallow Tales

Read "Swallow Tales" reviewed by Ian Patterson

It was Gary Burton who brought Steve Swallow—with electric bass in tow—into the teaching ranks of the Berklee College of Music in the early 1970s. Burton had already introduced Swallow's songs to the students, one of whom, a fresh-faced John Scofield, would go on to play and record with both men. Scofield and Swallow's musical partnership ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

John Scofield: One For Swallow

Read "John Scofield: One For Swallow" reviewed by Ian Patterson

From time to time in his storied career John Scofield will take a look over his shoulder and re-examine some of the music that has fed into his own, personal brand of jazz. The influences are many, for no matter the context that Scofield engineers, his distinctive sound always carries something of the blues, a little ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Something Cool - Celebrating Carol Sloane

Read "Something Cool - Celebrating Carol Sloane" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin

Women's History Month continues with new releases from saxophonist Lakecia Benjamin, vocalist Jay Clayton, pianist Nuphar Fey and guitarist Pat Metheny, with birthday shout outs to vocalist Carol Sloane in the first hour (pictured), along with Nicki Parrott, Rachelle Garniez, Billy Childs, Carole Bayer Sager, Tomoko Ohno, Anat Fort and Eric Comstock, among others.

ARTICLE: RADIO

Just You, the Secret Service and Me - Celebrating Johnny Mercer

Read "Just You, the Secret Service and Me - Celebrating Johnny Mercer" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin

Besides a celebration of songs by Johnny Mercer, the broadcast includes new releases from pianist Andrea Petrity, The DIVA Jazz Orchestra, vocalists Margaret Whiting, Karrin Allyson, Sonia Johnson, and the latest project from drummer Terri Lyne Carrington+Social Science plus more birthday shout outs to bassist Jen Hodge, vocalists Janet Lawson, Holli Ross, LaVern Baker, Ernestine Anderson, ...


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