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Paul Whiteman

Paul Whiteman's Orchestra was the most popular band of the 1920s. They are also the most controversial to Jazz historians because Whiteman billed himself as "The King Of Jazz". The Paul Whiteman Orchestra rarely played what is considered real Jazz today, despite having some of the great White Jazz soloists of the 1920s in his band. For the most part Whiteman played commercial dance music and semi-classical works. Jazz critics almost universally dislike his music, but he had his moments. Whiteman started as classical viola player. He played with the San Francisco Symphony and he led a band for the Navy during World War One

ARTICLE: PROFILE

Bucky Pizzarelli: Remembering Family Rhythms On The Roads Of New Jersey

Read "Bucky Pizzarelli: Remembering Family Rhythms On The Roads Of New Jersey" reviewed by Arthur R George

Guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli, from 1926 to his passing at age 94 on April 1, lived his entire life in New Jersey, and had said that he couldn't imagine living anywhere else. Forget the turnpike jokes. Remember instead the nearness to jazz in New York, the closeness of family, shared driving in the New Jersey night, the ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

The New Golden Age of Jazz Radio

Read "The New Golden Age of Jazz Radio" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

There was the Jazz Age, and later, the Golden Age of Radio. There was no golden age of jazz radio unless one considers the brief, ten-year reign of devolution when swing music dominated the airwaves. Think about this: New York City has not had a twenty-four-hour commercial jazz radio station in over ten years; decades longer ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Carla Campopiano Trio: Chicago/Buenos Aires Connections

Read "Chicago/Buenos Aires Connections" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Just as jazz was born in the brothels of New Orleans, tango was first played in disreputable dives along the banks of the River Plate (Rio de Plata), which forms the natural border between Argentina and Uruguay. It was a heady mix of the German waltz, the Czech polka, the Polish mazurka, the Bohemian schottische, the ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Up In Harlem - The Bands (1924 - 1929)

Read "Up In Harlem - The Bands (1924 - 1929)" reviewed by Russell Perry

In the last hour, we explored the jazz of King Oliver's Chicago in the 1920s, and heard from The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, clarinetists Jimmy Noone and Johnny Dodds, pianists Earl Hines and Lovie Austin, cornetist Freddie Keppard and trumpeter Jabbo Smith. Now we move to the other emerging center of the music, New ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Alan Broadbent: Intimate Reflections on a Passion for Jazz

Read "Alan Broadbent: Intimate Reflections on a Passion for Jazz" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Pianist, composer, and arranger Alan Broadbent doesn't just “dig" jazz. He has a deep and enduring passion for it. Growing up in mid- 20th-century New Zealand, he quickly went beyond piano lessons to reading musical scores and learning jazz standards. Then, when the Dave Brubeck Quartet came to his relatively isolated hometown of Auckland, his love ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part II

Read "Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part II" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Part 1 | Part 2 Part 1 of Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands looked at the roots, drivers and challenges of the travelling groups who brought jazz music to the non-urban areas of the Southern Plains, through one-night-stands, in often impromptu venues. A black phenomenon, often misappropriated by white musicians, promoters, ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part I

Read "Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part I" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Part 1 | Part 2 OriginsBy the second half of the 1920s, New York had supplanted jny: Chicago as the center of jazz. The “Jazz Age"--a label incorrectly ascribed to F. Scott Fitzgerald--could rationally have been framed as the “Dance Age." Prohibition, and the speakeasies that it spawned, were packed with wildly enthusiastic patrons ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Culture Clubs: Part IV: When Jazz Met Europe

Read "Culture Clubs: Part IV: When Jazz Met Europe" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

The Geography of Jazz--When Jazz Met Europe In 2004 Maureen Anderson, a researcher at Illinois State University contributed a dissertation to the journal, African American Review, titled The White Reception of Jazz in America. Ostensibly, her article deals with stories published in high profile periodicals and journals from 1917 and into the 1930s, written by white ...

ARTICLE: CATCHING UP WITH

Frank Woeste: Reversing Ravel

Read "Frank Woeste: Reversing Ravel" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu

Maurice Ravel is not only one of the great authors of 20th century classical music, but one of a handful of classical composers to have demonstrated an interest in jazz. During his tour of the United States in 1928, Ravel went to the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem, or Connie's Inn and the nearby Cotton Club, to ...


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