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ARTICLE: BOOK EXCERPTS

Mosaics: The Life and Works of Graham Collier

Read "Mosaics: The Life and Works of Graham Collier" reviewed by Duncan Heining

The following is an excerpt is from “Chapter 9: The Eighties or Graham Collier -The Wilderness Years" of Mosaics: The Life and Works of Graham Collier by Duncan Heining (Equinox Publishing, 2018). All Rights Reserved. The late Graham Collier was a bandleader, a composer and a jazz educator. As far as this latter ...

The Last Night At The Old Place

Read "The Last Night At The Old Place" reviewed by Duncan Heining

By any standards the release of The Last Night At The Old Place will prove to be one of archive releases of the year, second only, perhaps, to the 'Lost' Coltrane album. All power, therefore, to Mike Gavin who has inherited the Cadillac catalogue from the late John Jack with his first release of archive material. ...

ARTICLE: PROFILE

Malcolm Griffiths: A Man For All Seasons

Read "Malcolm Griffiths: A Man For All Seasons" reviewed by Duncan Heining

We talk often of the stars, like 'Trane and Miles. We remember the bandleaders, such as Basie and Duke. We even recall the composers and arrangers, Ellington again, Gil Evans and Monk. And we never forget those star soloists like Johnny Hodges or Lester Young. But the guys in the machine room, the guys who make ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Ray Russell: Playing with Time

Read "Ray Russell: Playing with Time" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Each time guitarist/composer Ray Russell releases a new album, it feels like a comeback. Now, More than Ever, Russell's debut on the Abstract Logix label, comes seven years after Goodbye Svengali (Cuneiform Records, 2006), his heartfelt tribute to composer Gil Evans. Although Russell may drop off the radar for periods of time, he's never really far ...

ARTICLE: PROFILE

Mike Westbrook: Art Wolf at 75

Read "Mike Westbrook: Art Wolf at 75" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Close your eyes for a moment. Imagine a jazz composer who began with Ellington and then moved on through Mingus. He soon encompassed rock music, Kurt Weill, Rossini, the traditions of English church music and the pastoralism of Vaughan Williams and Holst, but still found a place in his music for The Beatles, European political cabaret ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Mike Westbrook Orchestra: The Cortege

Read "The Cortege" reviewed by Chris May

At its richest, pianist/composer Mike Westbrook's work is to jazz what grand opera, in the classical world, is to chamber music. The Cortege is Westbrook at his richest, leading a 17-piece orchestra through an ambitious and brilliantly realized suite, loosely themed around the idea of a funeral procession and its after-party. Thirty years after its first ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

John Surman: Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop - April '69

Read "Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop - April '69" reviewed by Nic Jones

In the necessarily modestly expansive booklet note which accompanies this CD and DVD set, Brian Morton sets out the development of jazz in Britain, from its point of origin in the early decades of the twentieth century. He also rightly identifies the musical generation that came of age in the 1960s as having no sense of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

John Surman: Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop - April '69

Read "Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop - April '69" reviewed by Troy Collins

Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop--April '69 is a stunning discovery. Featuring unreleased material executed by a unique ten-piece line-up of European jazz luminaries, it provides a fascinating window into the development of British saxophonist John Surman at the very beginning of his career. Capturing an international all-star ensemble working through Surman's formative concepts, this informal studio session ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

John Surman: Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop - April '69

Read "Flashpoint: NDR Jazz Workshop - April '69" reviewed by John Kelman

1969 was a watershed year for John Surman. He released his eponymous debut on Dutton Vocalion that year, but it was the recording session for How Many Clouds Can You See? (Vocalion, 1970), that made the year of Woodstock and man's first steps on the moon so portentous for the 25 year-old saxophonist An album effortlessly ...


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