All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: Big John Patton

Results for "Big John Patton"

Advanced search options

Musician

Big John Patton

Born:

Big John Patton was born July 12, 1935 in Kansas City, Missouri. A self-taught musician, he started playing the piano in 1948 and landed his first big gig touring with R&B sensation Lloyd Price from 1954-1959. Upon his arrival in New York, around 1960, Patton began making the transition from piano to organ. Throughout the 1960's he recorded extensively for Blue Note Records as a leader and sideman, most notably with Grant Green and Lou Donaldson. His music evolved to incorporate elements of modal and free jazz, without ever losing the basic, earthy groove that he brought to it from the beginning. He wrote some organ jazz classics such as "Funky Mama" and "The Yodel." His music will be remembered fondly by musicians and fans

2

Article: Album Review

Mikko Innanen / Cedric Piromalli / Stefan Pasborg: This Is It

Read "This Is It" reviewed by Mark Corroto


When a Finn, a Dane, and a Frenchman take on the organ trio genre expect it to be funky and supercool. And This is It is just that. This new group pivots around Cedric Piromalli's Hammond organ in ways you might expect if you are a fan of the Blue Note 1960s sounds of Big John ...

2

Article: Radio & Podcasts

Hanksgiving - A Tribute to Hank Mobley, Part 1

Read "Hanksgiving - A Tribute to Hank Mobley, Part 1" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu


For our seasonal Hanksgiving show, this year we pay tribute to Hank Mobley, both as a saxophonist and a composer, by playing music from his albums, which are a cornerstone of the Blue Note sound and catalogue, and renditions of his music by musicians that came after him. There's so much to love in Mobley's repertoire. ...

37

Article: Building a Jazz Library

Blue Note Records: Lost In Space: 20 Overlooked Classic Albums

Read "Blue Note Records: Lost In Space: 20 Overlooked Classic Albums" reviewed by Chris May


For anyone with a passion for Blue Note, it is hard to conceive of an album that has been “overlooked," let alone twenty of them. For connoisseurs of the most influential label in jazz history, the passion can be all consuming: if a dedicated collector does not have all the albums (yet), he or she will ...

52

Article: Radio & Podcasts

50th Anniversary Blue Notes from August 1969

Read "50th Anniversary Blue Notes from August 1969" reviewed by Marc Cohn


Salutes to Blue Note recordings by organists John Patton (with James Blood Ulmer on guitar) and Lonnie Smith (live in Atlantic City), vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson (with Harold Land), saxophonist Lou Donaldson (with Charles Earland), The Three Sounds, pianist Andrew Hill (from a session never formally released on Blue Note), as well as Wayne Shorter (with a ...

2

News: Video / DVD

Big John Patton: Certain Feeling

Big John Patton: Certain Feeling

Big John Patton wasn't big. Playing the organ-combo circuit in late 1961 and early '62, a club owner began calling him “Big Bad John." The name was inspired by Jimmy Dean's record, Big Bad John, which was released in September of that year and went to #1 on Billboard's pop chart in early November. Patton told ...

1

Article: Album Review

James Blood Ulmer: Baby Talk

Read "Baby Talk" reviewed by Mark Corroto


It was a predestined meeting. This collaboration between the legendary guitarist James Blood Ulmer and the band The Thing. Ulmer, who cut his teeth with the soul jazz organists Hank Marr, Larry Young and Big John Patton before collaborating with Ornette Coleman's electric free jazz/funk harmolodic music, expanded upon Coleman's ideas, incorporating rock music with players ...

9

Article: Album Review

Organissimo: B3tles: A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four

Read "B3tles: A Soulful Tribute To The Fab Four" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan


When one thinks of jazz cities responsible for contributing some of the music's most important artists, Detroit is always a name that pops up at the top of the list. A short list of icons who hail from the city would have to include Ron Carter, the Jones Brothers, James Carter, Pepper Adams, Louis Hayes, and ...

3

Article: Album Review

Dennis Coffey: Hot Coffey in the D – Burnin at Morey Baker’s Showplace Lounge

Read "Hot Coffey in the D – Burnin at Morey Baker’s Showplace Lounge" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Who is Dennis Coffey? In this period of Adderall attention spans, Dennis Coffey is this: The Temptations' “Ball of Confusion" (Gordy, 1970); Edwin Starr's “War" (Gordy, 1970); Diana Ross and the Supremes' “Someday We'll be Together" (Motown, 1969). Does that ring a bell? I know everyone talks about the West Coast's “Wrecking Crew," but, Detroit had ...

13

Article: My Blue Note Obsession

Big John Patton: Along Came John - 1963

Read "Big John Patton: Along Came John - 1963" reviewed by Marc Davis


If you like Booker T and MG's, you'll love Big John Patton's Along Came John. It is, without a doubt, the funkiest, bluesiest, most soulful organ jazz record of all time, bar none. And that includes everything ever done by the legendary Jimmy Smith. Along Came John is a great party record, and once ...


Engage

Contest Giveaways
Enter our latest contest giveaway sponsored by AGS Recordings

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.