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The Django Festival All-Stars: Attitude Manouche

Read "Attitude Manouche" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It is a little known fact that Django Reinhardt was not only an incredible guitarist, he was also extremely good at stealing chickens. For the manouche clan of gypsies to which he belonged, this was a noble skill. He was saved from life as a chicken thief only when given a banjo-guitar at age 12. He ...

Brian Bromberg: Thicker Than Water

Read "Thicker Than Water" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Brian Bromberg specializes in smooth jazz. That's music with rough edges removed. He plays it on basses, upright and electric, and on piccolo basses which are tuned to sound like guitars.

It's all fiendishly clever but Bromberg remains modest. He uses a whole side of the album's cover to thank everyone, including God, ...

Erroll Garner: Night Concert

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It's the jazz equivalent of finding a Van Gogh or a Ming vase in the attic: the discovery of a complete 1964 perfectly recorded concert by one of the music's greatest virtuoso solo pianists. In the beginning was Art Tatum. Then came Oscar Peterson. Finally--and in many ways the most interesting of the holy trinity--was Erroll ...

Ronnie Cuber: Live At Montmartre

Read "Live At Montmartre" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Of all the musical instruments invented by Adolphe Sax in the mid-19th century, the baritone saxophone remains the least played. Harry Carney persuaded Duke Ellington to use the heavy, cumbersome instrument and it became a distinctive part of the band's sound. Others who have played the baritone saxophone include Cecil Payne, Pepper Adams, Serge Chaloff and--for ...

Jungsu Choi: Tschuss Jazz Era

Read "Tschuss Jazz Era" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Living in a state of unresolved civil war since 1945, and lately under threat of nuclear annihilation, obviously sharpens the senses, gives the Korean people an edge the rest of us don't have. Recently, Donald Trump took one look and was blown away. He said (or perhaps Tweeted), “These are wonderful, hard-working people."

...

Cyrille Aimee: Cyrille Aimee Live

Read "Cyrille Aimee Live" reviewed by Chris Mosey

As a little girl, Cyrille Aimée would climb out of the bedroom window of her home in Samois-sur-Seine, near Fontainbleau in northern France and run off to join local gypsies by their camp fires, playing jazz and singing just as they did with Django Reinhardt (who is buried nearby).

Reinhardt never managed to ...

Stanley Clarke: Stanley Clarke Band: The Message

Read "Stanley Clarke Band: The Message" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Once upon a time, he was the enfant terrible of jazz bassists, whizz-kid of Chick Corea's Return to Forever. On his latest album, The Message, at the ripe old age of 66, Stanley Clarke is very much the elder statesman, standing back on the cover pic, arms crossed, letting the youngsters grab the limelight and not ...

Duke Ellington And His Orchestra: The Treasury Shows Vol. 25

Read "The Treasury Shows Vol. 25" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Storyville Records, based in Copenhagen, have now completed the Herculean task of re-releasing all the Duke Ellington Treasury Show albums on CD. These are recordings of broadcasts made for the US Treasury Department from 1945 to 1953, to promote the sale of war bonds, often with plugs by Ellington himself, a staunch patriot. Volume 25 is ...

Duke Ellington: Duke Ellington In Coventry

Read "Duke Ellington In Coventry" reviewed by Chris Mosey

During World War Two, the Germans rained tons of high explosives, including parachute air-mines and incendiary petroleum mines on the English city of Coventry. In addition to factories supporting the British war effort, they destroyed the city's emblematic cathedral. Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's Minister of Propaganda, took to using “Coventry" as a synonym for mass destruction. Enemy ...

Diogo Vida: El Duende

Read "El Duende" reviewed by Chris Mosey

El Duende derives from the duende of Spanish mythology, an elf or magic creature. When the term is used in connection with music, especially flamenco, it means “having soul," something that gives you chills, makes you smile, or even cry, in response to an artistic performance. The Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca described it thus: “The ...