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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Daisuke Konno: Taking the D

Read "Taking the D" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Choosing material for his first album, Taking the D, melody came first and foremost for Japanese drummer Daisuke Konno. He says: “I picked songs with beautiful melodies because I wanted as many people as possible to enjoy my music--not just jazz lovers."

Konno's musical odyssey from Tokyo to New York City began with ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Carla Campopiano Trio: Chicago/Buenos Aires Connections

Read "Chicago/Buenos Aires Connections" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Just as jazz was born in the brothels of New Orleans, tango was first played in disreputable dives along the banks of the River Plate (Rio de Plata), which forms the natural border between Argentina and Uruguay. It was a heady mix of the German waltz, the Czech polka, the Polish mazurka, the Bohemian schottische, the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Gil Evans Orchestra: Hidden Treasures Vol. 1, Monday Nights

Read "Hidden Treasures Vol. 1, Monday Nights" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Gil Evans, the most innovative arranger in the history of jazz, died in 1988. He is remembered for his work with Miles Davis in the 1950s, starting with the ground-breaking album The Birth Of The Cool with a pianoless nonet, and peaking with Miles Ahead, in which he turned a collection of seemingly diverse songs into ...

ARTICLE: MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Classic vinyl remasterings from Storyville

Read "Classic vinyl remasterings from Storyville" reviewed by Chris Mosey

In time for the festive season, the Copenhagen label Storyville is reissuing three classic albums from its archives remastered on 180-gram vinyl: Charlie Parker In Sweden, 1950; Ben Webster Plays Ballads; and Sahib Shihab's “lost" minor masterpiece Sentiments.

The Charlie Parker album was recorded on November 24, 1950 at a concert in the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Ben Zahler's Songgoing: Quietly Cold

Read "Quietly Cold" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Swiss flautist Ben Zahler names his principal influences as Herbie Mann and Eric Dolphy. Having said that, he immediately backtracks. Mann was too commercial, Dolphy too experimental. Zahler positions himself somewhere between the two.

He strives to avoid the “streamlined sluggishness" of Mann and similarly has no truck with way-out, overblowing excess a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Jack Mouse Group: Intimate Adversary

Read "Intimate Adversary" reviewed by Chris Mosey

The great Spanish cellist Pablo Casals would sometimes refer to his instrument as his “intimate adversary." Illinois drummer/composer Jack Mouse has borrowed the term as title for a laid-back, carefully orchestrated piece, which he plans as the first movement of a two-part suite. It's the most ambitious number on this, the album of the same name, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chris Pasin: Ornettiquette

Read "Ornettiquette" reviewed by Chris Mosey

It's amazing how quickly what was billed as the future of jazz became its past. In 1959 when saxophonist Ornette Coleman released his third album, he wanted to call it Focus On Sanity. Instead, at the insistence of Atlantic producer Nesuhi Ertegun, it was portentously titled The Shape Of Jazz To Come. Other musicians took heed ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Christopher Hollyday: Telepathy

Read "Telepathy" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Born into a musical family in 1970, with a father who was crazy about bebop, there was little doubt where Christopher Hollyday would be going in life. He began playing alto saxophone when he was nine. His older brother Richard played trumpet and they played together in the Boston area for two years, causing the New ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Jorge Nila: Tenor Time (tribute to the Tenor Masters)

Read "Tenor Time (tribute to the Tenor Masters)" reviewed by Chris Mosey

The four participants on this album all hail from Omaha, Nebraska. Not a town that springs readily to mind in the history of jazz. Although, as drummer Dana Murray, recalls: “In the ballroom days everyone came through--Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Dinah Washington--the list goes on."

But it is the friendship and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chucho Valdes: Jazz Bata 2

Read "Jazz Bata 2" reviewed by Chris Mosey

With Jazz Bata 2, composer pianist and bandleader Chucho Valdés finally follows up on an experimental album he cut in Cuba in 1972. The subject matter of both records is the folklore and religious beliefs of the Yoruba slaves shipped to the Caribbean between 1770 and 1840.

On Jazz Bata 2 Valdés' piano ...