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Take Five with Maria Muldaur

Read "Take Five with Maria Muldaur" reviewed by Maria Muldaur

About Maria Muldaur

Maria Muldaur is best known for “Midnight At The Oasis," though she has toured extensively worldwide for over four decades, and has released 41 albums covering all stripes of American Roots Music, including Gospel, R&B, Jazz and Big Band, as well as several award-winning children's albums. Often joining forces with other ...

Sex and The Single Trumpet Player

Read "Sex and The Single Trumpet Player" reviewed by Steve Provizer

Jack Sheldon (November 30, 1931) and Chet Baker (December 23, 1929-May 13, 1988)—two trumpeter/vocalists with a great deal in common. They spent their years of jazz apprenticeship, the early 1950's, on the West Coast, largely in jny: Los Angeles. They played in similar styles and their musical career paths early on were pretty similar, although Baker ...

ARTICLE: BAILEY'S BUNDLES

Ten on Cellar Live

Read "Ten on Cellar Live" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

That crafty Canadian Cory Weeds was onto something with the creation of his Cellar Live and now Cellar Music label. He reveals himself as a man for all seasons in being a confident saxophonist, music historian, and archivist with his new label Reel to Real (in cooperation with that maestro of the catalog, Zev Feldman. With ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Izabella Effenberg: Crystal Silence

Read "Crystal Silence" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Many musicians play a second instrument, though rarely do they venture to record an entire album with it. Such a commitment would likely require complete technical command of the secondary instrument, or failing that, courage in spades. Izabella Effenberg has both. For her third release on Unit Records, following her sextet debut Cuentame and the trio ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Harold Danko: His Own Sound, His Own Time

Read "Harold Danko: His Own Sound, His Own Time" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

The famous sculptor, Henry Moore, hit the nail on the head when he said: “there's no retirement for an artist, it's your way of living so there's no end to it." This statement certainly rings true in the case of pianist and composer, Harold Danko. Even though he has retired from a long and distinguished career ...

ARTICLE: HISTORY OF JAZZ

Chet Baker’s Singing: A Cultural Shift

Read "Chet Baker’s Singing: A Cultural Shift" reviewed by Steve Provizer

We think of the 1950's as a time of relative social conformity, but in fact, there were significant cultural shifts happening. For one, male stereotypes were being unpacked and to some degree, unfrozen. Where once films and music gave us male characters that were either hyper-macho or limp-wristedly homosexual, male characters and performers who showed emotional ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Larry Dickson Jazz Quartet: Winter Horizons

Read "Winter Horizons" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Winter Horizons is the last of Cincinnati-based baritone saxophonist Larry Dickson's four-part salute to the seasons which began in 2015 with Second Springtime and includes Summergold Promises and Donora Autumn. As before, Dickson leads a quartet whose charter members are bassist Michael Sharfe and drummer Jim Leslie. Alto saxophonist Rick Van Matre, Dickson's band mate in ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Henry Butler, Ethel Ennis & More

Read "Henry Butler, Ethel Ennis & More" reviewed by Joe Dimino

Gary Bartz kicks off the 585th episode of Neon Jazz with Heavy Blue. From there, we profile cats who have been a part of his world and growth like Miles Davis and Charlie Parker. Then, we get into a host of new and old tracks from the likes of Quinsin Nachoff, Chet Baker, Iris Ornig and ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Jazz & Soundtracks

Read "Jazz & Soundtracks" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu

Jazz has had a very close relationship with cinema and TV. To be perfectly frank in this relationship cinema and TV have not as generous as jazz has been towards cinema.

Jazz has been only sporadically covered by quality movies. When that has happened the quantity of stereotypies and clichés about jazz spoiled them ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chuck Deardorf: Perception

Read "Perception" reviewed by Paul Rauch

Before the tech revolution that has ushered in an era of unprecedented growth and global recognition, the city of Seattle was a bit of an outpost in the world of jazz. Since the 1920s, the city has enjoyed a vibrant and innovative jazz scene, often resulting in local musicians backing major international touring artists. The emerald ...