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Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

ALBUM REVIEWS

Torhild Ostad / Carsten Dahl: Jeg roper til deg

Read "Jeg roper til deg" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

Back in 1982, the Norwegian singer, Radka Toneff, released a very special duo album with the American pianist, Steve Dobrogosz, called Fairytales. Since then, the fate of the music has also become something of a fairytale, with the album being chosen as one of the best Norwegian albums of all time. It seems almost impossible that someone would once again reach the heights of that iconic Norwegian album, but out of nowhere comes Jeg roper til deg, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Håkon Storm: Fosfor

Read "Fosfor" reviewed by Eyal Hareuveni

Norwegian guitarist Håkon Storm's sixth album Fosfor features his artistic mastery of the solo guitar. Storm is a gifted storyteller. His evocative, melodious lines intensify the expressive, poetic playing style that is often exploratory, suggesting exotic soundscapes. Storm uses a variety of guitars that allow him to stress distinctive originality as a composer and improviser. The album's warm, crystalline sound was captured beautifully by sound guru Jan Erik Kongshaug at the legendary Rainbow studio in Oslo, home-base of many ECM ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Cirrus: Méli Mélo

Read "Méli Mélo" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Norwegian group Cirrus started life as a drummerless trio when singer Eva Bjerga Haugen, saxophonist Inge Weatherhead Breistein and bassist Theodor Barsnes Onarheim met while studying performance and improvisation at the University of Stavanger. The final piece of the puzzle fell into place when teacher and drummer Stein Inge Braekhus joined for this debut recording, bringing a heightened sense of groove and shifting dynamics to what is essentially chamber jazz. Though the strikingly gifted Haugen may garner most plaudits for ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ferner/ Juliusson: Undertowed

Read "Undertowed" reviewed by Ian Patterson

The striking artwork on Undertowed serves as metaphor for guitarist Per-Arne Ferner and pianist Per Gunnar Juliusson's musical relationship. A brooding, cloud-heavy sky and a still sea seem like reflections of each other, or a seamless whole. The lone figure juxtaposed against this imposing landscape is at once a part of it, and yet apart. The inner gatefold reveals a snow blizzard on the left and two black birds in a leaf-shorn tree opposite--suggestive of quiet power, melancholy, and evolution. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Eple Trio: In the Clearing / In the Cavern

Read "In the Clearing / In the Cavern" reviewed by John Kelman

With all the controversy over what jazz is--and, more to the point, what it isn't--proprietary ownership often seems more about seemingly insurmountable cultural concerns. It's difficult for those living in the relative hustle and bustle of North American cities to appreciate a different pace, a different vibe--the effect, for example, of winters where daylight diminishes to a few short hours in the south of a country, to the far north, where polar winter imposes darkness for upwards of four months. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Ferner/ Juliusson: Undertowed

Read "Undertowed" reviewed by Eyal Hareuveni

The duo of Norwegian guitarist Per-Arner Ferner and Swedish pianist Per Gunnar Juliusson was established in 2008 and already in 2010 was awarded the title Young Jazz Musicians of the Year in the JazzIntro competition in Molde Jazz Festival. This award led to a series of promoted performances in the next two years, culminated in this debut recording. Ferner and Juliusson refer to themselves as the “Nordic school of ECM"-- lyrical, melodic and often introspective music. Their ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

BMX: Bergen Open

Read "Bergen Open" reviewed by John Kelman

Tradition, in a living, breathing art form, is something that is continually defined, refined and redefined. When drummer Paul Motian--first coming to fame in pianist Bill Evans' mid-1950s trio--trimmed his quintet of the early 1980s into a bass-less trio featuring then-emergent guitar whiz Bill Frisell and equally on-the-rise saxophonist Joe Lovano, its very first recording, It Should've Happened A Long Time Ago (ECM, 1985), defined a whole new aesthetic, challenging conventional roles and redefining how improvising musicians collaborate. Bergen Open, ...


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