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GETTING INTO JAZZ

Stan Getz And The Oscar Peterson Trio

Read "Stan Getz And The Oscar Peterson Trio" reviewed by Mark Barnett

Getting Started If you're new to jazz, go to our Getting Into Jazz primer for some hints on how to listen. CD Capsule Saxophonist Stan Getz shines in this disc, recorded early in his career with top-flight musicians who created a perfect setting for his skills and sensitivity. Give him an “A" in “Plays well with others." Background Like Zoot Sims (see If I'm Lucky in this “Getting Into Jazz" ...

BUILDING A JAZZ LIBRARY

Stan Getz

Read "Stan Getz" reviewed by Mark Barnett

The story of Stan Getz (1927-1991) has to begin with Lester Young. Before Young, tenor sax players seemed awash in testosterone. Their sound was full, rich, deep, blown hard out of the instrument's lower registers, with emotion pouring out in lavish swoops and honks. Then along came Lester. In the post-war 1940s, he invented a new way to play the tenor sax: softly, effortlessly, with no wasted notes, and above all, without drama. There was emotion, of course, but it ...

BAILEY'S BUNDLES

Stan Getz: Spring 1976

Read "Stan Getz:  Spring 1976" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

The musical specter of John Coltrane is so massive and dense that its creative gravity often does not allow even a whiff of his contemporary saxophone players. While certainly acknowledged as an innovator in his own right, saxophonist Stan Getz rarely gets the attention he deserves as often as many of his contemporaries. That is what makes the magic in these two previously unissued releases from Resonance Records. Getz reminds us here what a commanding presence in jazz he was ...

BUILDING A JAZZ LIBRARY

Creed Taylor Productions, Part 2

Read "Creed Taylor Productions, Part 2" reviewed by Creed Taylor

Part 1 | Part 2 The place in jazz history held by Creed Taylor is impeccable, stylish, and essential. He produced some of the best music for some of the best labels dedicated to jazz, then formed his own label and with meticulous preparation and his musician's ear kept on making great jazz records. Taylor began as a producer for Bethlehem Records, where his work with Charles Mingus stands among the label's best. In 1960, ...

JAZZ IN THE AQUARIAN AGE

Stan Getz: I'm Gonna Blow the Walls Down

Read "Stan Getz: I'm Gonna Blow the Walls Down" reviewed by Bob Kenselaar

[The music that Stan Getz made over the years was consistently moving and powerful. But he was probably putting me on a little when he said he was going to “blow the walls down" in New York for a series of shows early in 1979. When someone gives you a headline like that, though, you go with it. He was a little more straightforward later in the interview when he said, “I'm a thoughtful player. I don't believe in blasting ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Stan Getz Quintette: Jazz At Storyville

Read "Stan Getz Quintette: Jazz At Storyville" reviewed by Chris May

Stan Getz QuintetteJazz At StoryvilleRoyal Roost1951 For his casual listeners, tenor saxophonist Stan Getz peaked during the bossa nova craze of the early to mid 1960s. And as Verve's five-disc, 2008 box set, The Bossa Nova Albums, reminded casual and committed listeners alike, Getz and bossa nova were, indeed, made for each other. But anyone willing to rewind through the 1950s will find a cornucopia of less well ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Stan Getz: Quintets - The Clef and Norgran Studio Albums

Read "Stan Getz: Quintets - The Clef and Norgran Studio Albums" reviewed by Chris May

Stan GetzQuintets: The Clef & Norgran Studio AlbumsVerve/Hip-0 Select2011 A pleasure to handle and a thrill to play, this limited edition box set brings together all the quintet studio recordings made by tenor saxophonist Stan Getz for impresario Norman Granz's Clef and Norgran labels, soon to be rolled together as Verve, between December 1952 and January 1955. The three discs capture Getz's emergence as a small group bandleader newly at the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Stan Getz: Apasionado

Read "Apasionado" reviewed by Chris May

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz's neo-big band album Apasionado has been consigned to minor league status since its original release in 1990. It does, indeed, look unpromising: recorded in fall 1989, when Getz was undergoing treatment for the cancer which would kill him less than two years later; with a pair of synthesizers replicating a string section; and with the commercially astute but MOR focused Herb Alpert producing.

But 20 years on and rereleased, Apasionado rises way above expectations. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Stan Getz: Legacy

Read "Legacy" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Here's a pleasant surprise: “previously unissued material" by tenor sax giant Stan Getz that by and large deserves to be more widely disseminated and heard. Legacy is comprised of five sessions spanning the years 1980-86, including three numbers with the Woody Herman Herd and another with Getz and pianist Jimmy Rowles performing Rowles' “The Peacocks." The other seven tracks embody three quartet dates.

While the sound is uneven, as one would expect on such a compilation, the audio's not as ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Stan Getz: Stan Getz with Guest Artist Laurindo Almeida

Read "Stan Getz with Guest Artist Laurindo Almeida" reviewed by Andrew Velez

This is music that may be impossible to listen to while remaining still. The instant Stan Getz and Laurindo Almeida take off with “Minina Moca" ("Young Lady"), the party's on. Although the performances throughout are masterful, nothing is about showboating. This is music of great beauty in a totally relaxed setting. By the 1960s, Almeida was already a veteran of West Coast studio dates and years with Stan Kenton's big band. Kenton first heard the guitarist in ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Stan Getz: At The Shrine

Read "At The Shrine" reviewed by Chris May

This latest reissue in the Verve Originals series--which in early 2009 brought us the superb five-CD box set Stan Getz: The Bossa Nova Albums--tends to be overlooked when lists of tenor saxophonist Stan Getz's early classics are compiled. A 1954 live recording from The Shrine in Los Angeles, it was originally released on Norman Granz's Norgran label over two LPs. This CD release includes in its entirety a 53-minute concert set by the Getz quintet plus another 17 minutes recorded ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Stan Getz: Dynasty

Read "Dynasty" reviewed by Chris May

Verve's Originals series, which in late 2008 brought us tenor saxophonist Stan Getz's wonderful box set The Bossa Nova Albums (Verve, 2008), follows through with a remastered reissue of Dynasty, a double album recorded in 1971, a decade or so after Getz gave jazz its final, sustained hurrah in the pop charts with bossa nova. Relatively little known in the US, in part because the quartet which made it was refused permission to perform in the country, Dynasty is an ...