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EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Turtle Records: Pioneering British Jazz 1970-1971

Read "Turtle Records:  Pioneering British Jazz 1970-1971" reviewed by Roger Farbey

This extended analysis discusses the celebratory release of the Turtle Records story, a clamshell box set containing a fifty page, 17,000 word booklet written by John McLaughlin biographer Colin Harper which includes rare photographs and new interviews. Crucially, it also includes the only three recordings to be issued on the label. The albums, originally released in 1970 and 1971, were by British jazz musicians whose respective stars were in the ascendant at that time, namely Mike Osborne, Howard Riley and ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

John Taylor: Giulia's Thursdays

Read "John Taylor: Giulia's Thursdays" reviewed by Chris May

John TaylorGiulia's ThursdaysCam Jazz2012There has been a flurry of activity around film music this spring/summer 2012, all of it good. Warner Jazz has released an anthology of movie themes written by the Italian composer Nino Rota, Collector Nino Rota; Alex Sutton's piano trio took northern European movie composers as its inspiration on Legentis (F-IRE); and University of Illinois Press has published John Caps' biography, Henry Mancini: Reinventing Film Music.British pianist ...

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John Taylor: Requiem for a Dreamer

Read "Requiem for a Dreamer" reviewed by John Kelman

It's been three years since John Taylor's last trio disc, but this time the British pianist takes a small detour, rather than continue the winning streak of Angel of the Presence (Cam Jazz, 2006) and Whirlpool (Cam Jazz, 2008). Requiem for a Dreamer reunites Taylor with his longstanding trio--Swedish bassist Palle Danielsson and British drummer Martin France--but with the addition of saxophonist Julian Argüelles., he makes an inspired choice, capitalizing on the chemistry of the trio while adding a fourth ...

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John Taylor and John Geggie: Ottawa, Canada October 9, 2010

Read "John Taylor and John Geggie: Ottawa, Canada October 9, 2010" reviewed by John Kelman

John Taylor/John GeggieNational Arts Centre Fourth Stage Ottawa, Canada October 9, 2010 After an impressive start to its 2010 Fall/Winter Series, the TD Ottawa International Jazz Festival kept the momentum up by bringing another of modern jazz's finest pianists to town, less than a week after Chick Corea and his latest trio, with bassist Christian McBride and drummer Brian Blade, delivered a well-received show at Dominion Chalmers Church the previous Sunday. John Taylor so rarely makes ...

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John Taylor: Phases

Read "Phases" reviewed by John Kelman

As much as he's become a major proponent of the piano trio tradition, John Taylor is gradually building a solo piano discography that may not be as voluminous or popularly acclaimed as those of Keith Jarrett's, but certainly bears comparison as much for its substantial differences as for any perceived similarities. While Taylor himself would cite Jarrett as being an influence alongside Bill Evans and Chick Corea, Phases further distances him from his roots, demonstrating ongoing growth from previous solo ...

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John Taylor: Whirlpool

Read "Whirlpool" reviewed by John Kelman

For his follow-up to the remarkable Angel of the Presence (Cam Jazz, 2006), John Taylor continues to mine the strong chemistry between himself, bassist Palle Danielsson and drummer Martin France. It's a more balanced set this time around, with three of the pianist's own compositions alongside three by longtime musical compatriot Kenny Wheeler, one jazz standard and a surprising reinvention of a classical piece by Gustav Holst.

Quietly, and without much fuss, Taylor has gradually emerged ...

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John Taylor: Whirlpool

Read "Whirlpool" reviewed by Martin Gladu

John Taylor is the pianist of weightlessness. Although overly simple, this aphoristic description of the English virtuoso's dense yet liberated musical discourse renders justice not only to its inherent quality, but to the effect it imparts to listeners. Suspended above an evanescent pulse, swift, jolted rhythms loose their grip; upwardly clouting modulating, mellifluous aural jaunts of texturally multifarious phrases and voicings. Tones, pristine and silvery, jump out like garish colors on a De Kooning canvas. Projects featuring his playing have ...

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Guildhall Big Band with Special Guest John Taylor: Pure and Simple

Read "Pure and Simple" reviewed by John Kelman

It would be easy to call Pure and Simple a John Taylor project, since all the charts are his and he's a featured soloist on every track. But, as was the case with the Australian Jazzgroove Mothership Orchestra's The Mothership Plays the Music of Mike Nock (Jazzgroove, 2006), that would be a mistake. As part of CAM Jazz's CAM Jazz Presents series, aimed at creating exposure for some of today's younger jazz talents, it's important to delineate this as an ...

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John Taylor: Angel of the Presence

Read "Angel of the Presence" reviewed by John Kelman

British pianist John Taylor has been an active player since the late 1960s with a range of partners including trumpeter Kenny Wheeler, reedman John Surman and drummer Peter Erskine. But, excluding his Azimuth trio with Wheeler and singer Norma Winstone, he has put out few releases as a leader until the beginning of this decade. Still, his manifest presence pervades every recording he's played on. In some cases, like his 1990s work with Erskine and bassist Palle Danielsson, so much ...

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John Taylor: Angel of the Presence

Read "Angel of the Presence" reviewed by AAJ Staff

English pianist John Taylor, who's now in his mid-60s, has worked with a variety of partners on the ECM label. For a while there, he seemed to have nestled comfortably into a particular vibe, generally sounding quiet and lyrical, soft and elastic, not ever really crossing the line. He was quite reliable for that sort of thing, actually. But listening to this new trio release, recorded in late 2004, it's pretty clear that the pigeon has popped out of its ...

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John Taylor: Angel of the Presence

Read "Angel of the Presence" reviewed by Martin Gladu

The title sums this record up perfectly. Presence can be defined as the feeling of being close to someone or something, sometimes of a supernatural order; and angels, symbols of spiritual elevation and purity, are ethereal heavenly beings. English pianist/composer John Taylor has succeeded in crystallizing the two not only in a poetic title, but also the music on this release. Maybe the aptly titled album is a quiet homage to the late pianist's spouse, whose computer-generated artistic work garnishes ...

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John Taylor Trio: Rosslyn

Read "Rosslyn" reviewed by Mark Corroto

At age 61, pianist John Taylor has finally made his major label debut as a leader. But then again, Rosslyn doesn't really have a chieftain. Taylor, who has been a sideman since the 1970s, seems not to mind sharing his rostrum with his two bandmates: bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Joey Baron.

The British-born Taylor gained early recognition with John Surman, before becoming the house pianist at Ronnie Scott's club. Critical acclaim came with the group Azimuth (with ...


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