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Paul Giallorenzo's Git Go: Force Majeure

Read "Force Majeure" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Pianist Paul Giallorenzo's Force Majeure, his second album with his ensemble GitGo, covers a wide variety of motifs but maintains a consistently stimulating, darkly hued ambience. This and Giallorenzo's unique style and modal harmonies give the disc its cohesive character. The music ranges from the free flowing, five-way conversation on “A Tone" to the undulating, reggae influenced “Roscoe Far I." On the former the members of the quintet create their simultaneous monologues out of sparse notes, honks, thrums ...

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Paul Giallorenzo Trio: 3

Read "3" reviewed by Mark Corroto

The Paul Giallorenzo Trio with Norwegian bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten and drummer Tim Daisy recorded this Chicago session in 2007. Since then, individual members have joined other bands and associations, but this disc documents a short lived yet musically significant project.Giallorenzo has previously released the quintet sessionGet In To Go Out (482 Music, 2009) and he also plays in electric/acoustic improvised settings in Chicago.Employing the standard piano trio format, Giallorenzo's compositions bounce between composed melodies and ...

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Paul Giallorenzo: Get In To Go Out

Read "Get In To Go Out" reviewed by Troy Collins

The 15th album in 482 Records' Document Chicago Series, Get In To Go Out is the debut of pianist Paul Giallorenzo's quintet. One of the few free-leaning pianists working in the Windy City's vital new music scene, Giallorenzo's angular approach towards writing and improvising draws inspiration from the seminal Post-War innovations of such pianists as Thelonious Monk, Herbie Nichols, and early Cecil Taylor.

As co-founder and director of the creative non-profit Elastic Arts, Giallorenzo entertains a range of ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Paul Giallorenzo: Get In To Go Out

Read "Get In To Go Out" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Pianist Paul Giallorenzo locates the jazz he makes with his quintet somewhere in the early 1960s, when post-bop was getting ready to explode into free jazz and its pioneers were rooted in swing, but thinking outward thoughts. Eric Dolphy's Out To Lunch (Blue Note, 1964), Ornette Coleman's Tomorrow Is The Question (Contemporary, 1959), and Andrew Hill's Point Of Departure(Blue Note, 1964) come to mind.

Even the sound on Get In To Get Out hints at a Blue Note session, with ...


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