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Ian Carr

Ian Carr has been at the forefront of British modern jazz for over 40 years. He started playing trumpet in his brother Mike’s band, the EmCee 5 in the very early 1960s. This bebop-influenced band even boasted a young John McLaughlin in its lineup at one point.

He moved down to London from his home turf of the North East of England and then met up with various jazz musicians, including sax player Don Rendell. He teamed up with Don and together they formed one of the most influential British modern jazz quintets ever heard. The Rendell-Carr Quintet was something of a jazz supergroup, and although they only recorded five albums, for the EMI Columbia Lansdowne series label, these still command high secondhand prices on eBay. Apart from Rendell and Carr, the Quintet also featured Colin Purbrook on piano on their first album Shades of Blue only. Pianist Michael Garrick was recruited from their second album Dusk Fire onwards, and penned many of the compositions recorded. The Quintet was completed by Trevor Tomkins on drums and Dave Green on bass. Unusually and significantly, the Rendell-Carr Quintet was really the first British small jazz group to record only their own compositions, many of which were lengthy and distinctive.

During the 1960s, Carr recorded not only with the Rendell-Carr Quintet, but also with Michael Garrick’s various groups on some remarkable albums including Promises, Black Marigolds and The Heart is a Lotus. He also recorded with Joe Harriott and Amancio D’Silva, notably on Integration and Hum Dono.

BBC Radio 1 DJ Gilles Peterson recently selected no less than two tracks by the Rendell- Carr Quintet (”Black Marigolds” and “Dusk Fire”) for his first British jazz compilation album Impressed, which also featured Tubby Hayes, Ronnie Ross, Mike Garrick, Joe Harriott, Graham Collier and Harry Beckett. The Impressed series is a very important showcase for some of the great British modern jazz of the 1960s and 1970s, most of which had not seen the light of day since their original vinyl releases. Peterson clearly appreciated the importance of the Rendell-Carr Quintet.

Just prior to the Rendell-Carr Quintet split-up at the end of the 1960s, Ian Carr had attempted to move the Quintet into more adventurous, experimental areas employing the likes of percussionist Guy Warren. As witness to this mood for experimentation, Carr cut a record a few years earlier which was much freer than anything he had done before. Springboard, released on the Polydor label, is a now long-lost LP that offered some intriguing compositions, some by Carr, including a version of “Crazy Jane.” Although the album’s artwork did not mention this, the LP’s vinyl labels actually had printed on them “The Ian Carr/Jeff Clyne Quartet.” However, the album cover was more egalitarian and displayed the names of the other two musicians, Trevor Watts and John Stevens, in letters of equal prominence to those of Carr’s and Clyne’s. This album could have been seen to be and, in many ways was, an early Spontaneous Music Ensemble recording.

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Album Discography

Recordings: As Leader | As Sideperson

Penumbra II

Jazz In Britain
2022

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Kaleidoscope Of...

Jazz In Britain
2021

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Solar Session

Jazz In Britain
2021

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Blue Beginnings

Jazz In Britain
2021

buy

Torrid Zone - The...

Esoteric Recordings
2019

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