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Renaud Garcia-Fons: Entremundo

John Kelman By

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Renaud Garcia-Fons: Entremundo Some records are instantly captivating, with an ambience that immediately draws the listener in. Others require more attention, revealing layers of reward with each successive listen. The best records do both. Bassist Renaud Garcia-Fons has managed with his latest disc, Entremundo , to create one of those rare recordings whose first spin compels the listener to play it again and again, revealing richer substance each time.

That Garcia-Fons has been called "the Paganini of the double bass" is no surprise. One listen to the closing piece, the solo "Aqâ Jân," and the breadth of his capabilities is clearly evident. With his five-string double-bass giving him access to the range of a cello in addition to the deeper resonance of the traditional instrument, Garcia-Fons' virtuosity is remarkable. From percussive pizzicato to sweeping arco, his ability to coax distinct and unusual sonorities from his instrument is uncanny.

And while Garcia-Fons' technical skill is evident from the first note of "Sueño Vivo," which opens the album, he is equally matched by his trio mates, percussionist Jorge "Negrito" Trasante and flamenco guitarist Antonio Ruiz "Kiko." Yet, for all their formidable abilities, Entremundo is never about needless pyrotechnical demonstration. From the light and airy folk sound of "Cristobal" to the lush classical leanings of the title track, Garcia-Fons and his trio, supplemented by a variety of musical guests on various tracks, are never less than lyrical and transcend being mere players.

Entremundo means "Between Worlds," and while the majority of the record has a strong flamenco flavour that will appeal to fans of, for example, Strunz and Farah, it's distinguished by a breadth of world view. There are elements of Middle Eastern harmonies, Oriental lines and Latin American rhythms amidst the Andalusian themes of "40 Dias," the brief and dark "Doust," and "Sarebân," which blends in an Indian-inflected theme.

Garcia-Fons states that the intention of the record is to be celebratory, and there is, to be sure, a vivacious joy to be found throughout. Passion runs wild, with Garcia-Fons leading the way with his vibrant and emotive playing. Few bassists straddle the line between being a supporting rhythm section instrument and a leading voice as well as Garcia-Fons. Regardless of where he is placing his priority, the augmented trio shuffles responsibilities seamlessly and effortlessly. This is strongly groove-centric music that moves the body as well as the heart.

Another characteristic of exceptional records is to make one forget about the individual contributions and experience the music as a transcendent whole. While the admirable skill of all involved makes this sometimes difficult, at the end of the day the album succeeds as an incredibly broad cross-fusion of ethnic influences from around the globe. Entremundo succeeds in making music that draws a coherent link between various musical worlds and, consequently, lives up to its name by fusing the music of a diversity of cultures with an improvisational verve and, in the final analysis, a pure and unadulterated joy in making evocative and provocative music.

Visit Renaud Garcia-Fons on the web.

Track Listing: Sueno Vivo; Cristobal; Entremundo; Mahoor; 40 Dias; Entre Continentes; Mursiya; Rosario; Doust; Sareban; Aqa Jan (bass solo)

Personnel: Renaud Garcia-Fons (five string bass, tanbur, voice, percussion), Jorge "Negrito" Trasante (drums, bombo, udu, all Latin percussion), Antonio Ruiz "Kiko" (flamenco guitar)
With: Henri Tournier (bansuri, flutes), Claire Antonini (tar, vistres, luth baroque), Gaston Sylvestre (cymbalum), Angel Sanchez-Gonzalez "Cepillo" (palmas, cajon, jalco, pandeiro), Bruno Caillat (tablas, daf, kanjeera), Philippe Slovinsky (trumpet), Allen Hoist (tenor sax)

Year Released: 2004 | Record Label: Enja/Justin Time | Style: Latin/World


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