Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

6

Album Review

Joanie Pallatto: My Original Plan

Read "My Original Plan" reviewed by Jack Bowers


"Give my new disc a spin," Chicago-based vocalist Joanie Pallatto e-mailed. “I think you'll like it." That was more than twenty years ago, and Pallatto was right. That album, Words & Music (Southport Records, 1999), was splendid, as was Pallatto, reciting memorable lyrics by Rodgers & Hart, the Gershwin brothers, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Hoagy Carmichael, Bob Dorough and others. It's now 2021 and Pallatto has recorded another “new disc," My Original Plan, on which she sings as well as ever. ...

4

Album Review

George Freeman/Chico Freeman: All In The Family

Read "All In The Family" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky


There are few things more quintessentially “Chicago" in jazz than the Freeman family. Tenor titan Von Freeman ruled the roost in The Windy City decade after decade until his death in 2012; his brother, George Freeman, played with everybody from saxophonist Charlie Parker to organist Shirley Scott; his other brother, the late Eldridge “Bruz" Freeman, was part of the house band at the Pershing and the drummer in Hampton Hawes' quartet with Jim Hall; and Von's son, saxophonist Chico Freeman, ...

418

Album Review

Fred Anderson: Black Horn Long Gone

Read "Black Horn Long Gone" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee


Fred Anderson is one of today's most powerful and singular saxophonists. Recorded in 1993, this trio (with bassist Malachi Favors and drummer Ajaramu--aka AJ Shelton--who have both since passed away) flies blissfully to new heights for piano-less sax trios. To call Anderson a member of the free jazz movement produces an incomplete picture. His technical facility and penchant for swinging is more influenced by Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young and Charlie Parker. Even an unaccompanied solo homage, “Ode To Clifford Jordan," ...

231

Album Review

The Miyumi Project: re: Rooted

Read "re: Rooted" reviewed by Jim Santella


Double bassist Tatsu Aoki leads this avant-garde ensemble in a program of creative improvised music that reflects the roots of Asian/American jazz. The instrumental timbres that he's chosen to augment this saxophone and percussion ensemble provide distinctive colors. Aoki's big, booming bass leads the way while huge taiko drums manage the session's rhythmic foundation.

The use of violin and shinobue (a Japanese flute) reaches back into tradition to instill a unique flavor. Thus, modern jazz receives an influx ...

142

Album Review

Bradley Parker-Sparrow: Shut Eye

Read "Shut Eye" reviewed by Jim Santella


Bradley Parker-Sparrow's music for the film Shut Eye provides the kind of emotion that enhances each scene appropriately: moody blues and seamless shadows, along with an energetic drive to support the film's characters. With vocalist Joanie Pallatto and trumpeter Bobby Lewis, he creates a dark, mysterious framework. Sparrow's piano gently caresses each melody when the scene requires it, and pushes hard and actively at other times. Intrigue and tension come hand in hand with romantic smiles.

Sparrow and ...

145

Album Review

Harold Fethe: Out of Nowhere

Read "Out of Nowhere" reviewed by Jim Santella


Swing is the thing on this debut session from guitarist Harold Fethe. As one who's never lost his love for the Great American Songbook and its lyrical surprises, he's at home with his musical partners on this date: Johnny Frigo (violin), Joe Vito (piano, acoordion) and Jim Cox (bass). Together, they have a good time celebrating the memories.

Take the 'A' Train is converted into a stiff waltz that turns corny in its merry-go-round interpretation. “You Are My ...

149

Album Review

Bobby Lewis: Instant Groove

Read "Instant Groove" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza


Bobby Lewis' recurring theme in speaking about the music here is of the “instant groove. Lewis is right in drawing attention to the idea, for that groove is not a myth. To bring it home all the more conclusively, Lewis uses various lineups and gives these compositions their due, all of which makes for a recording that is entertaining on several levels.

The ripple effects of a heady tune are felt as the guitar and horns greet “Morning, which the ...


Engage

Contest Giveaways
Enter our latest contest giveaway sponsored by Vinyl Me, Please
Publisher's Desk
Holiday Season = Giveaway Season!
Read on.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.