Home » Jazz Articles

Jazz Articles

Our daily articles are carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page. Read our daily album reviews.

Sign in to customize your My Articles page —or— Filter Article Results

96
Album Review

Fred Van Hove: Piano Solo

Read "Piano Solo" reviewed by Mark Corroto


Belgian pianist Fred Van Hove has always been identified with the European free music movement, but he also stands outside the cadre of players that formed the FMP label. This rerelease (first time on CD) of two solo LPs, Prosper (1981) and Die Letzte (1986), reaffirm his personality and uniqueness as an improvising player. Piano Solo comes as part of the limited edition box FMP im Rückblick--In Retrospect (1969-2010), with its extraordinary 218-page book full of photographs, articles, ...

224
Album Review

Peter Brötzmann: Wolk In Hosen

Read "Wolk In Hosen" reviewed by Mark Corroto


In a blindfold test--and not knowing he was but 11 years old when this solo session was recorded in 1976--the sound heard on Wolk In Hosen might be mistaken for that of Swedish saxophonist Mats Gustafsson. But no, it is, indeed, Gustafsson's hero and musical role model, the fire-breathing Peter Brötzmann. Also released as part of the limited edition, 12-CD box FMP im Rückblick--in Retrospect (1969-2010) (FMP, 2010)--with an extraordinary 218-page book full of photographs, articles, and a ...

254
Album Review

Schlippenbach Quartet: At Quartier Latin

Read "At Quartier Latin" reviewed by Mark Corroto


Released as part of the limited edition box FMP im Rückblick--in Retrospect (1969 - 2010), this recording by pianist Alexander von Schlippenbach's Quartet, At Quartier Latin, is an incomparable time capsule that documents a crucial period in European improvisation and the development of today's jazz luminaries. Available separately from the 12-CD box, this disc brings together two live recordings--originally released as The Hidden Peak (FMP, 1977) and Three Nails Left (FMP, 1975)--featuring Schlippenbach's trio, which was regularly expanded ...

181
Album Review

Gunter Christmann / Mats Gustafsson / Paul Lovens: Trio

Read "Trio" reviewed by Nic Jones


The language of free improvisation is decades old now and its power to shock has arguably diminished accordingly. If there's something in the contention that everything once radical is eventually co-opted by an ever broadening mainstream, free improvisation still gives the lie to it. Still the creative process behind it can appear inscrutable, and the very lack of predetermination often gives the resulting music a singular tension and release. Both that creative process and the tension and ...

256
Album Review

Christmann / Gustafsson / Lovens: Tr!o

Read "Tr!o" reviewed by Mark Corroto


The first meeting (and there have been many more since) of this trio is a cause for a celebration that asks: “What took you so long?" Recorded live in 1994, this stellar document should not have taken sixteen years to surface.

Wrong righted, it celebrates the introduction of Swedish saxophonist Mats Gustafsson (then age 30) with two improvisers twenty years his elder: cellist/trombonist Gunter Christmann and percussionist Paul Lovens. Gustafsson had already collaborated on the first-rate discs Mouth ...

429
Album Review

Peter Brotzmann: Lost & Found

Read "Lost & Found" reviewed by Mark Corroto


Lost & Found finds iconic free jazz reedman Peter Brötzmann recording both solo and live for the first time ever. Throughout the 50-plus years of music-making, his live recordings are probably the best at capturing the essence of this great man's passion; and further, hearing him without accompaniment is a direct line into his thoughts. Previous solo efforts like this one are found on Free Music Production, a label he helped christen with Jost Gebers in 1969. ...

292
Album Review

Peter Brotzmann: Lost & Found

Read "Lost & Found" reviewed by Nic Jones


It's important to point out that this is Peter Brötzmann entirely solo on various reeds because, with this particular advocate of the free, the solo context has always amounted to something entirely different to his group work. As an unaccompanied soloist, he has always been an antithesis of Evan Parker's seamless flow on soprano sax in particular, as if Brötzmann's accommodation within the moment is of a radically different order.

That's best highlighted here by ..."Got A Hole In It," ...

442
Album Review

Olaf Rupp / Marino Pliakas / Michael Wertmuller: Too Much Is Not Enough

Read "Too Much Is Not Enough" reviewed by Nic Jones


This guitar, bass and drums trio has clearly moved beyond the power trip that such a line-up might imply. In doing so they have entered what, on the basis of this release, is a kind of nihilistic phase in which the power stems from collective endeavor, as opposed to any conventionally virtuosic approach.

This isn't necessarily a good thing, especially when much of the resulting music's impact is subcutaneous. An insidious sound lies beneath the skin of “Stoppare," even while ...

323
Album Review

Stefan Keune / Hans Schneider / Achim Kramer: No Comment

Read "No Comment" reviewed by Nic Jones


Improvised music is rife with precedents in these early years of the twenty-first century, both on record and otherwise. The one for the trio of saxophone, bass and drums was set under the leadership of Sonny Rollins over half a century ago and since then the line-up has been amply documented on record. Set against those precedents the music here covers an awful lot of ground, but in so doing perhaps loses a certain depth of identity.

Not that this ...

194
Album Review

Alexander von Schlippenbach: Piano Solo '77

Read "Piano Solo '77" reviewed by Nic Jones


Pianist Alexander von Schlippenbach hasn't so much refined his art over the course of his decades-long career as he has redefined his musical personality according to the demands of the setting he's working in and the musical company he's keeping. While that suggests adaptability, that tendency is tempered by the simultaneous singularity of his musical personality. This recital from 1977 is, therefore, a record of a work in progress, just as any recording of this pianist's trio is with saxophonist ...


Get more of a good thing!

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories, our special offers, and upcoming jazz events near you.