Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

5

Album Review

Whit Dickey / William Parker / Matthew Shipp: Village Mothership

Read "Village Mothership" reviewed by Mark Corroto


If drummer Whit Dickey, bassist William Parker, and pianist Matthew Shipp were a rock band, we might expect them to cover their classic album Circular Temple (Quinton Records, 1992) an LP, later re-released on the Infinite Zero label in 1994. Of course they are not a rock band, but If they were, we probably would demand they perform the music on Circular Temple in the exact same manner as it sounded three decades earlier. But that's just not the way ...

20

Album Review

Whit Dickey Trio: Expanding Light

Read "Expanding Light" reviewed by Glenn Astarita


Highly respected, longtime New York City-based drummer Whit Dickey, frequent collaborator, and laudable alto saxophonist Rob Brown and young bassist Brandon Lopez consummate this trio's debut recording. As most would surmise, the musicians explore and refresh the peripheries of free jazz improvisation. Dickey and Brown's involvement with the always fertile NY improv scene is well-documented. Here, the band takes a democratic approach with close-knit interactions and formidable upfront asymmetrical grooves using space to impart breathing room and gradual ...

2

Radio & Podcasts

Whit Dickey, Sara Serpa & Stanley J. Zappa

Read "Whit Dickey, Sara Serpa & Stanley J. Zappa" reviewed by Maurice Hogue


This first July show features the debut of a new record label with a focus on improvisation: Tau Forms. The artistic director is drummer Whit Dickey, and it happens that his new Expanded Light is one of first two releases by the label; the other comes from pianist Matthew Shipp. Good luck to Tao Forms! I thought I'd throw in a little Zappa for you this episode, but it's not Frank, it's his saxophone-playing nephew, Stanley J. Zappa who teamed ...

3

Radio & Podcasts

Music from new label Tao Forms

Read "Music from new label Tao Forms" reviewed by Bob Osborne


Tao Forms is a new recording label launched in Spring 2020. Drummer—improviser—composer Whit Dickey is both the creative director and executive producer of this fresh endeavour. Matthew Shipp's The Piano Equation was the label's inaugural release. It was followed by Expanding Light, which is the new work by Whit Dickey himself. The music is distributed by the Aum Fidelity label. On this show I feature tracks from both of those albums as well as other music from the ...

17

Album Review

Whit Dickey: Morph

Read "Morph" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


Two players on Morph, Matthew Shipp and Nate Wooley, hardly need an introduction to those who venture into free jazz or experimental waters. But the leader, free jazz drummer Whit Dickey, is more of an enigma. Though prolific, his credits are more often in a supporting role. Dickey has been working with Shipp for nearly four decades in David S. Ware's quartet, Shipp's trio and his own projects. The New York native has recorded with Rob Brown, Eri Yamamoto, Daniel ...

4

Radio & Podcasts

Whit Dickey, Asher Gamedze, Quin Kirchner, Icepick and More

Read "Whit Dickey, Asher Gamedze, Quin Kirchner, Icepick and More" reviewed by Maurice Hogue


Three albums by drummers highlight this episode. South Africa's Asher Gamedze's Dialectic Soul brings to light the freer, more avant side of contemporary South African jazz (perhaps in a way that the revered Louis Moholo Moholo did over fifty years ago), while drummer Quin Kirchner's latest delves into various rhythms and tributes to favorite musicians. Tying it together with his usual free jazz style is Whit Dickey who drops two distinctly different albums, both with Matthew Shipp, one with Nate ...

8

Album Review

Whit Dickey/Kirk Knuffke: Drone Dream

Read "Drone Dream" reviewed by Mark Corroto


If the duo of drummer Whit Dickey and cornetist Kirk Knuffke were a baseball team, their signature style would be small ball, the opposite of towering home runs and 100 mph fast balls. They would win games like they sound here with tight efficient playing. They lay down perfect bunts and easily turn the double play with these improvisations. Opening with “Soaring," the sounds hesitates without being reluctant. Neither party, both of whom have the ability, attempts to overwhelm the ...


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