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Rashied Ali

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Rashied Ali is a progenitor and leading exponent of multidirectional rhythms/polytonal percussion. A student of Philly Joe Jones and an admirer of Art Blakey, Ali developed the style known as "free jazz" drumming, which liberates the percussionist from the role of human metronome. The drummer interfaces both rhythmically and melodically with the music, utilizing meter and sound in a unique fashion. This allows the percussionist to participate in the music in a harmonic sense, coloring both the rhythm and tonality with his personal perception. By adding his voice to the ensemble, the percussionist becomes an equal in the melodics of collective musical creation rather than a "pot banger" who keeps the others all playing at the same speed. Considered radical in the 1960s and scorned by the mediocre, multidirectional rhythms, polytonal drumming is now the landmark of the jazz percussionist. A Philadelphia native, Rashied Ali began his percussion career in the U.S

Article: Album Review

Christopher Kunz, Florian Fischer: Die Unwucht

Read "Die Unwucht" reviewed by Alberto Bazzurro


Facendo largo uso delle pratiche più “contemporanee" (jazzisticamente parlando ma non solo) dei rispettivi strumenti, e nella loro reciprocità (quindi da un'ottica abbastanza lontana da quelli che sono un po' i sacri testi, i modelli di riferimento, in materia, vale a dire gli storici duetti coltraniani con Elvin Jones e Rashied Ali), peraltro senza spendersi in ...

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Article: Album Review

Ornette Coleman: New York Is Now & Love Call Revisited

Read "New York Is Now & Love Call Revisited" reviewed by Mark Corroto


These sessions, the last two Ornette Coleman would record for Blue Note Records, in April and May of 1968, are generally remembered for the rhythm section. Was it Coleman or producer Francis Wolff that invited John Coltrane's former sidemen, bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones to record? Was this a scheme to draw the Coltrane ...

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Article: Building a Jazz Library

George Coleman: An Alternative Top Ten Albums

Read "George Coleman: An Alternative Top Ten Albums" reviewed by Chris May


Born in Memphis, Tennessee, saxophonist George Coleman cut his teeth in local rhythm and blues bands and made his first recording, aged twenty, with B.B. King in 1955. That year he switched from alto to tenor, because King already had an alto player; but Coleman has continued to play the alto from time to time and, ...

Album

Why Not? Porto Novo! Revisited

Label: Ezz-thetics
Released: 2021
Track listing: La Sorella; Fortunato; Why Not; Homecoming; Similar Limits; Sound Structure; Improvisation; QBIC; Porto Novo.

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Article: Live Review

The Afro Algonquin Trio Live at Michiko Studios

Read "The Afro Algonquin Trio Live at Michiko Studios" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


The Afro Algonquin Trio Michiko Studios New York, NY November 20, 2021 The TrioLee “Mixashawn" Rozie is a member of the Maheekanew Confederacy of Algonquin-speaking people. Rozie is Mohegan and his name “Mixashawn" means “the messenger on the wind." The multi-instrumentalist has not been heavily recorded over his long career, perhaps, ...

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Article: Film Review

Fire Music: The Story of Free Jazz

Read "Fire Music: The Story of Free Jazz" reviewed by Chris May


Fire Music: The Story of Free Jazz Submarine Deluxe 2021 There is much to like about this lovingly put together history of the so-called free jazz of the 1960s and 1970s. Over a decade in the making, the film, directed by self- declared genre obsessive Tom Surgal, is a compilation ...

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Article: Building a Jazz Library

Unconventional Instruments

Read "Unconventional Instruments" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


ECM regularly tops lists of the best jazz labels though their full name--Edition of Contemporary Music--would argue for a broader scope of content. A substantial number of their most popular albums, such as Carla Bley's Escalator Over The Hill (1974), Egberto Gismonti: Dança Dos Escravos (1989), Nils Petter Molvær's Khmer (1997), and many more, are not ...

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Article: Album Review

Christopher Kunz & Florian Fischer: Die Unwucht

Read "Die Unwucht" reviewed by Chris May


Saxophone and drums duos--usually that means tenor saxophone and drums--got serious in the mid 1960s, when pianist McCoy Tyner and bassist Jimmy Garrison would lay out during performances by John Coltrane's classic quartet to allow Coltrane and drummer Elvin Jones to pursue their mutual shamanistic muse together. One such occasion is preserved on One ...

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Article: Multiple Reviews

The Pandemic Sessions: Duos, Part 1

Read "The Pandemic Sessions: Duos, Part 1" reviewed by Mark Corroto


After the initial shock of the COVID-19 crisis and subsequent lockdown, artists did what artists do. Unable to tour, many musicians created solo projects. Musicians, like other sentient beings though, crave contact, so when some of the most severe restrictions lifted, duos were formed and production returned. These small positive steps (note: some were recorded before ...


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