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Musician

James Hall

Born:

Hailed as "A warm-toned lyrical player” with “harmonic sophistication” (Kirk Silsbee, Downbeat Magazine), James Hall is a versatile trombonist/composer re-imagining professional musicianship for the millennial generation. Hall’s sophomore release, Lattice (Outside In 2018), described as “a masterpiece of chamber music” (JazzLife Magazine), is built around the harmonious combination of Hall’s dexterous trombone and the virtuosic flute playing of Jamie Baum, a pliable and expressive study in contrasts. Kirk Silsbee praised the work’s “graceful instrumental combinations and linear development” (Downbeat Magazine), and Bob Morello called the work “a tasty treat” and “a potpourri of great tunes” (Boston Post-Gazette). Previously, Hall blurred the line between classical chamber music and free jazz with Soon We Will Not Be Here (2015), creating original settings of poetry by contemporary New York City-based poets Tina Chang, Paolo Javier, Malena Mörling, and Emily Ruth Hazel for quartet

Album

Lattice

Label: Outside in Music
Released: 2018
Track listing: Shoy; Black Narcissus; Lattice; Brittle Stitch; Gallardia; Traveler; Kind Folk; Terrace.

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Song of the Day

Shoy

Album:
By
Label: Outside in Music
Released: 2018
Duration: 7:50

Album

Lattice

Label: Aerophonic Records
Released: 2017
Track listing: A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing; Loose Snus; If You Get Lost In Santa Paula; Linger Longer; Horse Court; Serene.

4

Article: Album Review

Dave Rempis: Lattice

Read "Lattice" reviewed by John Sharpe


Since the AACM pioneered solo instrumental performance it has become a rite of passage for most creative musicians. In some ways the surprise is that saxophonist Dave Rempis, as one of the most fluent improvisers of his generation, has waited until now to record his first unaccompanied recital. That he rises to the challenge should be ...

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Article: Album Review

Dave Rempis: Lattice

Read "Lattice" reviewed by Mark Corroto


I recall an interview with a lionized baby boomer saxophonist, who told the story of listening to side one, and only side one, of John Coltrane's A Love Supreme (Impulse!, 1965). He was reluctant to turn the LP over (this was in the pre-digital era), thinking side two could never match the majesty of “Acknowledgement" and ...


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