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Musician

Cat Anderson

Born:

William Alonzo "Cat" Anderson grew from a childhood in the Jenkins Orphanage to become the acclaimed lead trumpet player with Duke Ellington and one of the most recognized high-note trumpet players of all time. Born in Greenville, South Carolina, he was put in the orphanage after both his parents died during his childhood. He soon took on the name "Cat," that would stick for the rest of his life, for his fighting style at the orphanage. His music career began on larger horns, like the trombone and baritone, but when he showed considerable talent, the orphanage granted his wish: he received his first trumpet. Anderson grew to be a standout with the orphanage bands, and his first official departure from the orphanage was with a group of fellow Jenkins players that called themselves the Carolina Cotton Pickers

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Article: Radio & Podcasts

Raining Cats And... Even More Cats!

Read "Raining Cats And... Even More Cats!" reviewed by H William Stine


I wanted to do a special show for a special audience who never choose to listen to the show but listen to the show nearly every week, often sitting in someone's lap or, more likely, sitting in exactly the chair someone else wants to sit in. So I dedicated the show to all the cats who ...

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Article: Album Review

Jon Raskin: Book 'P' of Practitioners

Read "Book 'P' of Practitioners" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian


Saxophonist Steve Lacy was famous for writing music dedicated to artists who inspired him. Some of his rarely heard etudes for solo saxophone are divided equally into three books, each named by a letter. Of these, he only recorded one set in his lifetime, Hocus Pocus—Book 'H' of “Practitioners" (Crépuscule, 1986). Equally idiosyncratic saxophonist Jon Raskin, ...

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Article: Profile

Greg Abate: Man on a Journey

Read "Greg Abate: Man on a Journey" reviewed by Rob Rosenblum


After a warm up tune by the trio of Frank Puzzullo on piano, Sam Edwards on bass and Edwin Hamilton on drums, a medium sized fellow with slicked back hair and very casual attire walks on stage. He seems almost reticent as he acknowledges his audience at Fox's Music House in North Charleston, South Carolina—most of ...

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Article: Album Review

Lasse Lindgren Big Constellation: The Unrecorded Fox

Read "The Unrecorded Fox" reviewed by Jack Bowers


When it comes to playing high-note jazz trumpet, the late great Maynard Ferguson was, is and perhaps always will be the standard to which every specialist in that limited field aspires. Yes, there have been assorted claimants--Cat Anderson, Ziggy Elman, Jon Faddis, Dave Stahl, Eric Miyashiro, Wayne Bergeron and Dennis Noday spring to mind--but no one ...

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Article: Album Review

Duke Ellington: Duke Ellington In Coventry

Read "Duke Ellington In Coventry" reviewed by Chris Mosey


During World War Two, the Germans rained tons of high explosives, including parachute air-mines and incendiary petroleum mines on the English city of Coventry. In addition to factories supporting the British war effort, they destroyed the city's emblematic cathedral. Joseph Goebbels, Hitler's Minister of Propaganda, took to using “Coventry" as a synonym for mass destruction. Enemy ...

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Article: Interview

Julian Priester: Reflections in Positivity

Read "Julian Priester: Reflections in Positivity" reviewed by Paul Rauch


My task for the day was to interview legendary trombonist/composer, and jazz icon, Julian Priester. We had met a few times over my 35 years of frequenting the jazz scene in Seattle, coinciding with Priester's years teaching at the esteemed Cornish College of the Arts. In anticipation, I had spent nearly two months preparing, reacquainting myself ...

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Article: Album Review

Duke Ellington & His Orchestra: Rotterdam 1969

Read "Rotterdam 1969" reviewed by Jack Bowers


Here's a succulent and long-hidden treat for Duke Ellington aficionados: a wide-ranging and reasonably well-recorded concert performance by the Ellington orchestra from 1969 at the Do Doelen Concert Hall in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Many of Ellington's tried-and-true favorites are here, along with a number of lesser-known themes such as tenor Paul Gonsalves' feature, “Up Jump"; “Come ...

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Article: Album Review

Duke Ellington And His Orchestra: Rotterdam 1969

Read "Rotterdam 1969" reviewed by Chris Mosey


Right up to the end Duke Ellington maintained an ability to surprise lesser mortals with his impish wit. In 1969 he visited the White House to celebrate his 70th birthday and kissed President Richard Nixon on the cheek four times. When Nixon asked why four times, Ellington replied, “One for each cheek." Tricky ...

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Article: Interview

Dave Burrell: Pianist Navigating the Windward Passages

Read "Dave Burrell: Pianist Navigating the Windward Passages" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer


Dave Burrell is a master pianist and composer who encountered the avant-garde in the 1960s and has been following his own independent path ever since. He combines classical and jazz elements that are both “inside" and “outside" the mainstream. The title of a poem by J.V. Cunningham, “The Metaphysical Amorist" characterizes much of his playing, which ...


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