Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

326

James Carter: Present Tense

Greg Camphire By

Sign in to view read count
Multi-reedist James Carter has been steadily chugging along as a master of many instruments and styles since his auspicious recording debut in the early '90s, often operating under the radar while maintaining a consistent commitment to quality performances.



With the release of Present Tense, Carter lets us know exactly where he's at with a well-paced collection of lyrical and concise statements, harvesting a deep sense of swing and letting his curious imagination roam free with the assistance of a killer band.



The tunes, most of which are in the 4 to 7-minute range, offer a concentrated and disciplined approach. "Rapid Shave" is an old-fashioned swinger taken at a bright tempo, with Carter's blazing baritone sax edged by pianist D.D. Jackson's pleasingly percussive and heavy-handed playing, displaying the influence of Don Pullen's abstract yet blues-based ideas. The similarly up-tempo bop of Gigi Gryce's "Hymn of the Orient" showcases a band that is totally on point with the angular arrangement, wasting no time for frills as they hit it, then quit it with the flourish of a sweet rubato coda.



Highlights of the set include two of the leader's features on bass clarinet. "Bro. Dolphy" expresses Carter's admiration for Eric Dolphy's singular influence on the instrument in question. The tightly-wound bop head evolves into an elegant ballad, before getting loose with an impressionistic spaciousness that references Dolphy's classic Out to Lunch (Blue Note, 1964). And like Dolphy, Carter's bass clarinet sound is velvety smooth, emotionally expressive and technically agile.



The same goes for "Shadowy Sands," the Jimmy Jones-composed tune that was a rare bass clarinet feature for Ellingtonian star Harry Carney back in the day. An alternating groove cushions Carter's fluid phrasing of the melody line, expertly shadowed by Dwight Adams' sublime trumpet sound, as it segues from a languid Latin beat to a tight shuffle.



The album boasts a few choice cuts on the mellow tip as well, with a version of Django Reinhardt's "Pour Que Ma Vie Demeure" that finds Carter offering some romance on the soprano, backed by Jackson's super-classy keys. The Spanish bolero-style beat of "Sussa Nita" is underscored by the twinkling harmonics of guest guitarist Rodney Jones, whose solo gives props to the street sophistication of players like Kenny Burrell and Melvin Sparks, while percussionist Eli Fountain adds a welcome touch of chiming colors. And the album-closer "Tenderly" is like a flawless piece of a film noir soundtrack, evoking a late-night taxi ride uptown, or some humid summertime porch reverie.



Carter's eclectic choices continue on a hip-hop-inflected "Song of Delilah," with some fun simultaneous soloing between darting sax and trumpet; and a welcome revival of the little-known "Dodo's Bounce," a bebop-era chestnut from the underrated pianist Dodo Marmarosa that showcases Carter's flute, Adams' muted tone and the tasty brushes of drummer Victor Lewis.



This solid, straight-ahead outing sounds both "old-timey" (in the best sense), with deep roots in blues and swing; and exploratory, never sacrificing Carter's personal approach, while maintaining his place in the jazz tradition.


Track Listing: Rapid Shave; Bro. Dolphy; Pour Que Ma Vie Demeure; Sussa Nita; Song of Delilah; Dodo's Bounce; Shadowy Sands; Hymn of the Orient; Bossa J.C.; Tenderly.

Personnel: James Carter: flute, bass clarinet, soprano sax, tenor sax, baritone sax; Dwight Adams: trumpet-flugelhorn; D.D. Jackson: piano; James Genus: bass; Victor Lewis: drums; Rodney Jones: guitar; Eli Fountain: percussion.

Title: Present Tense | Year Released: 2008 | Record Label: Unknown label

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop Music & Tickets

Click any of the store links below and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Vilddjur CD/LP/Track Review
Vilddjur
by Ian Patterson
Published: December 11, 2018
Read Lines in Sand CD/LP/Track Review
Lines in Sand
by Geno Thackara
Published: December 11, 2018
Read Like A Fire That Consumes All Before It CD/LP/Track Review
Like A Fire That Consumes All Before It
by Mark Sullivan
Published: December 11, 2018
Read The Brave CD/LP/Track Review
The Brave
by Geannine Reid
Published: December 11, 2018
Read Strings 1 CD/LP/Track Review
Strings 1
by Glenn Astarita
Published: December 11, 2018
Read Pillars CD/LP/Track Review
Pillars
by Karl Ackermann
Published: December 10, 2018
Read "Higher" CD/LP/Track Review Higher
by Jim Trageser
Published: August 16, 2018
Read "Song From No Man's Land" CD/LP/Track Review Song From No Man's Land
by Gareth Thompson
Published: April 17, 2018
Read "Live at Sowieso" CD/LP/Track Review Live at Sowieso
by Glenn Astarita
Published: October 20, 2018
Read "The Complete Lansdowne Recordings 1965-1969 (Vinyl box set)" CD/LP/Track Review The Complete Lansdowne Recordings 1965-1969 (Vinyl box set)
by Roger Farbey
Published: December 9, 2018
Read "Fred Hersch Trio: Live in Europe" CD/LP/Track Review Fred Hersch Trio: Live in Europe
by Jerome Wilson
Published: June 26, 2018
Read "Transatlantic" CD/LP/Track Review Transatlantic
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: March 22, 2018