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Steven Wilson: Home Invasion: In Concert at the Royal Albert Hall

Read "Home Invasion: In Concert at the Royal Albert Hall" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

One component of progressive rock composer/vocalist/guitarist/ Steve Wilson's widespread appeal pertains to his rather boyish charm and heartfelt vocal delivery. A strong composer and supreme melody-maker, the artist seduces the audience with the notions of living and breathing the experiences and implications of a song's lyrics. And he helped pave the way for post progressive rock stylizations as the founder of the hugely successful and influential band, Porcupine Tree. Moreover, he's collaborated with several named artists and ensembles over the ...

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Rolling Stones: From the Vault: The Marquee Club Live in 1971

Read "From the Vault: The Marquee Club Live in 1971" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

From The Vault: The Marquee Club Live In 1971 documents the end of the Rolling Stones' tour of the United Kingdom that year. The band had not toured at home since 1966 and touted this tour as the concert-equivalent of good bye to Great Britain before becoming tax exiles and absconding to the South of France and the historic recording of Exile on Main Street (Rolling Stones, 1972) at the Villa Nellcôte. Both events were recently the subjects of author ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

From the Vault: The Marquee Club Live in 1971

Read "From the Vault: The Marquee Club Live in 1971" reviewed by Doug Collette

Somewhat late to the archival exploration of their fifty-year plus vault, the Rolling Stones are making up for lost time with titles like this. The Marquee Club Live in 1971 reaffirms the notion the conic British group were never a better band than at this juncture of their career. Recorded with impeccable sound by long-time Stones collaborator Glyn Johns and artful camera work for American television at the intimate London club a month prior to the release of ...

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Portnoy - Sheehan - Macalpine - Sherinian: Live In Tokyo

Read "Live In Tokyo" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

This 2-CD set highlights the progressive rock super-group's performance at a Tokyo venue in 2012. The material is culled from the respective artists' songbooks, yet their prior collaborations in various ensembles also signify a nucleus for modern prog-rock fare. As one would anticipate, sparks are flying all over the place via a high-velocity and impacting program in front of a very receptive audience. It is chock full of blitzing time signatures amid soaring and uncompromising solo spots by all. The ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Return to Forever: The Mothership Returns

Read "Return to Forever: The Mothership Returns" reviewed by John Kelman

Return to Forever The Mothership Returns Eagle Rock Entertainment 2012 When keyboardist Chick Corea announced--following a successful world tour of his reunited 1970s-era fusion juggernaut Return to Forever, which, featuring guitarist Al Di Meola, bassist Stanley Clarke and drummer Lenny White, included a high octane 2008 performance that was one of the best-attended in the Ottawa International Jazz Festival's three-decade history--that he'd be reuniting the earlier incarnation of the group responsible for Hymn of the ...

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Jeff Beck: Performing This Week... Live at Ronnie Scott's

Read "Performing This Week... Live at Ronnie Scott's" reviewed by Doug Collette

Performing This Week... Live at Ronnie Scott's, recorded during a 2007 run at the renowned London club, is Jeff Beck's first release on the Eagle label after a long-standing tenure on Epic Records. It's an understatement to say it bodes well for the continued vigor of the man who replaced Eric Clapton in The Yardbirds.

Recent setlists haven't varied dramatically on Beck's last few tours, and the length of performances here never exceeds six minutes, so this isn't exactly a ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Emerson, Lake & Palmer: Isle of Wight 1970: The Birth of a Band

Read "Isle of Wight 1970: The Birth of a Band" reviewed by John Kelman

Few groups can look back to a single point in time where they leapt from relative obscurity to fame, announcing the arrival of a new and utterly distinctive sound. Keyboardist Keith Emerson had attracted attention for his staggering technique and theatrical pyrotechnics in The Nice. Bassist/vocalist Greg Lake found himself the center of acclaim with King Crimson's 1969 debut, In the Court of the Crimson King, as well as the group's subsequent American tour and ultimate meltdown. Carl Palmer had ...