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ALBUM REVIEWS

King Crimson: Live in Newcastle, December 8, 1972

Read "Live in Newcastle, December 8, 1972" reviewed by John Kelman

"Never say never," or so the old adage goes. When it comes to music, there are two more that should be added: “farewell tour" and, most certainly as it relates to King Crimson's Live in Newcastle, December 8, 1972, “the complete recordings." This, the 48th in the veteran group's King Crimson Collector's Club series of archival releases, turns out not just to be an unexpected addition to the group's Larks' Tongues in Aspic (Panegyric), but belies that fifteen-disc, 2012 40th ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

King Crimson: Official Bootleg: Live in Chicago, June 28th, 2017

Read "Official Bootleg: Live in Chicago, June 28th, 2017" reviewed by John Kelman

As many King Crimson fans eagerly await the November release of its latest 40th Anniversary Series box set--this time spanning the years 1970 through 1972, when saxophonist/flautist Mel Collins was a constant alongside band co-founder/guitarist Robert Fripp for three studio albums (1970's In the Wake of Poseidon and Lizard, and 1971's Islands) and one live album (1972's Earthbound)--along comes Official Bootleg: Live in Chicago, June 28th, 2017, another “warts and all" live soundboard recording along the lines of Live In ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

The Road to Red

Read "The Road to Red" reviewed by John Kelman

Another massive King Crimson box, hot on the heels of the 15-disc, 40th Anniversary Series Larks' Tongues in Aspic: The Complete Recordings (DGM Live, 2012), which brought new meaning to the word heavy by collecting every known note--ranging from low to hi-fi--played by the then newly forged, five-piece edition of a group that, in addition to sole founding member Robert Fripp, also featured violinist/keyboardist David Cross, bassist/vocalist John Wetton, drummer Bill Bruford and, most significantly, percussionist and all-around madman x-factor ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Larks' Tongues in Aspic (40th Anniversary Series Box)

Read "Larks' Tongues in Aspic (40th Anniversary Series Box)" reviewed by John Kelman

The idea of a 15-disc box set to commemorate the release of what was, in 1973, a single vinyl LP clocking in at a mere 46 minutes might seem a tad excessive, but when you're talking King Crimson and the seminal Larks' Tongues in Aspic, it's a whole other story. Beyond being an important addition to the legendary progressive rock group's 40th Anniversary Series of new stereo and surround sound mixes from Crimson cofounder/guitarist Robert Fripp and guitarist/keyboardist/singer Steven Wilson-a ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

The Wine of Silence (with Andrew Keeling and David Singleton)

Read "The Wine of Silence (with Andrew Keeling and David Singleton)" reviewed by John Kelman

It's strange how things sometimes come around full circle...well, almost. After helping to define symphonic prog with King Crimson and the seminal In the Court of the Crimson King (DGM Live, 1969)--mellotrons screaming instead of a real orchestras swirling--the rigors of the road, and keeping a band together, caused co-founder/guitarist Robert Fripp to desert such problems entirely by 1975. He began touring with fellow sonic explorer Brian Eno in support of their groundbreakers No Pussyfooting (DGM Live, 1973) and Evening ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Discipline (40th Anniversary Series)

Read "Discipline (40th Anniversary Series)" reviewed by John Kelman

If King Crimson fans were shocked, stunned and grief-stricken when the seminal art-rock group was disbanded by its only original founding member, guitarist Robert Fripp, in September 1974--seemingly at the height of its power and prowess--then it's certain that many of them didn't exactly know what to make of Exposure (DGM Live) in 1979. After continuing to hone the tape-driven Frippertronics that he innovated with ex-Roxy Music keyboardist Brian Eno, on the equally seminal No Pussyfooting (DGM Live, 1973), Fripp ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Starless and Bible Black (40th Anniversary Series)

Read "Starless and Bible Black (40th Anniversary Series)" reviewed by John Kelman

They may be rolling out slower than fans would like, but given the superlative work that Porcupine Tree's Steven Wilson has been doing to bring the decades-old King Crimson catalog into the 21st century--creating vibrant new stereo and 5.1 surround sound mixes, with Crimson co-founder/guitarist Robert Fripp's direct involvement and/or approval--he can be forgiven for taking the extra time to get them just right. So far, Wilson has managed to respect the original material, while creating more three-dimensional audio landscapes ...


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