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Jazz Articles about Tomo Jacobson

10
Album Review

Torben Snekkestad / Soren Kjaegaard / Tomo Jacobson: Spirit Spirit

Read "Spirit Spirit" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


“I love the illusive, enigmatic nature of this material. Being in that space can perhaps leave the listener with the only obvious choice of just listening to what is rather than understanding any of it." Tomo Jacobson Polish-born, Copenhagen-based bassist Tomo Jacobson embraces a minimalist mode on his Spirit Spirit. The cover art is a looping line drawing on white; the music is spacious and calm, every note selected in the moment, with seeming great deliberation--although improvisation, by ...

8
Album Review

Maneri / Kalmanovitch / Jacobson / Osgood: Variations On No Particular Theme - Part 1

Read "Variations On No Particular Theme - Part 1" reviewed by Mark Corroto


This free improvisation chamber quartet is an interesting study in bold, yet even-tempered music making. Tomo Jacobson, the Polish-born bassist now making Copenhagen his home, assembled this Europe-meets-North American cast for what appears to be the beginning of a beautiful relationship. Jacobson is joined by Danish drummer Kresten Osgood and two violists, the Canadian Tanya Kalmanovitch and American Mat Maneri. Jacobson and Osgood are members of the septet Moonbow, and the drummer released Tzokth Songs (Isula Jazz, 2016) along with ...

5
Album Review

Il Sogno: Graduation

Read "Graduation" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


The group Il Sogno, a piano trio that employs a Wurlitzer piano along with an OB-6 synthesizer, steps back and forth over the line of melodic pop sensibilities into accessible jazz and soundtrack atmospherics to orchestral and sweeping soundscaping, presenting long and winding accompaniments to a surreal dreams—pretty in one tune, challenging and out there on the next. Birthday (Gotta Let It Out, 2017) is the band's first album. The follow-up—the disc in hand—is Graduation. The Polish-Danish-Italian trio—that ...

9
Album Review

Tomo Jacobson: When the sleeping fish turn red and the skies start to sing in C major I will follow you to the end

Read "When the sleeping fish turn red and the skies start to sing in C major I will follow you to the end" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


Copenhagen-based bassist Tomo Jacobson--employing his musical vehicle, Moonbow--creates a musical ruckus with When the sleeping fish turn red and the skies start to sing in C-major I will follow you to the end (how's that for a CD title?). And it sounds like a ruckus in the blacksmith shop--metallic, slashing guitar, raucous, ragged-edged, tin/brass saxophones over a pumping-bellows bass and hammering drums. All this, and the sounds still has a feeling of structure--albeit a loose one--that allows the individual instrumentalists ...

7
Album Review

Tomo Jacobson: When the sleeping fish turn red and the skies start to sing in C major I will follow you to the end

Read "When the sleeping fish turn red and the skies start to sing in C major I will follow you to the end" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard


Every record seeks its ideal listener, but this concept is very abstract and often remains a riddle, but to Polish-born bassist, Tomo Jacobson, his ideal listener is very real and responded in the best possible way to the music on his album When the sleeping fish turn red and the skies start to sing in C major I will follow you to the end. The name of the listener is the iconic bassist and composer, William Parker, ...


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