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Jazz Articles about Sarah Vaughan

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Radio & Podcasts

Opulence: Grenache Blanc Meets Sarah Vaughan

Read "Opulence: Grenache Blanc Meets Sarah Vaughan" reviewed by Kristen Lee Sergeant


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Jazz & Juice

Opulence: Grenache Blanc Meets Sarah Vaughan

Read "Opulence: Grenache Blanc Meets Sarah Vaughan" reviewed by Kristen Lee Sergeant


Welcome to 2022's first Jazz & Juice--I'm excited to journey with you into the realm of wine and song in this new year! I think you'll enjoy this month's hedonistic theme no matter what you've resolved for the new year. Opulence Opulence brings to mind abundance, ornamentation, wealth and, well, muchness. A profusion or abundance of something can hazard gratuitousness, yet it also may lead to the delightfully decadent. Opulence brings us past the point of necessity and ...

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Radio & Podcasts

Sarah Vaughan, Petter Eldh, Artifacts, Immanuel Wilkins and More New Releases

Read "Sarah Vaughan, Petter Eldh, Artifacts, Immanuel Wilkins and More New Releases" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu


A lil' dive in the 1970's world of soul—or funk-tinged jazz, then some adventurous large ensembles; a focus on Scandinavian artists and the first single from Immanuel Wilkins' sophomore release. It's a set with lots of interesting facets.Happy listening!Playlist Ben Allison “Mondo Jazz Theme (feat. Ted Nash & Pyeng Threadgill)" 0:00 Sarah Vaughan “Inner City Blues" Mainstream Funk Revisited (WEWANTSOUNDS) 0:16 Host talks 4:23 Julien Lourau “Red Clay" Power of Soul, the Music of CTI (Komos) ...

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Radio & Podcasts

Wrapping Up Womens History Month With New Releases and Birthday Shoutouts To Aretha Franklin And Sarah Vaughan

Read "Wrapping Up Womens History Month With New Releases and Birthday Shoutouts To Aretha Franklin And Sarah Vaughan" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin


This broadcast wraps up Womens History Month featuring new releases from Bill Cunliffe, Jeff Coffin & Helen Gillet, vocalists Joanie Pallatto, Hannah Baiardi and Georgia Mancio plus birthday shoutouts to Sarah Vaughan, Aretha Franklin, Meredith D'Ambrosio, Renee Rosnes, Hiromi, Mimi Jones and Stacey Kent, among others. Thanks for listening and please support the artists you hear by purchasing their music during this time of lockdown.Playlist Artemis “ Big Top" from Artemis (Blue Note) 00:00 Joanie Pallatto “My Original ...

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Radio & Podcasts

Jazz Singers in the 1950s – Sarah Vaughan, Helen Merrill, Dinah Washington and Abbey Lincoln (1954 - 1962)

Read "Jazz Singers in the 1950s – Sarah Vaughan, Helen Merrill, Dinah Washington and Abbey Lincoln (1954 - 1962)" reviewed by Russell Perry


Many jazz singers of the 1950s continued the tradition of recording with major instrumentalists who were given the space to improvise, feeding off the collaboration. In 1954, EmArCy records matched three of their singers, representing the wide range of their offerings--Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Helen Merrill--with jazz ensembles featuring their rising star, trumpeter Clifford Brown. Brown's quintet partner, Max Roach anchored several outings that featured his wife, Abbey Lincoln with the all-star ensembles including trumpeter Booker Little, trombonist Julian ...

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Radio & Podcasts

Celebrating Sarah Vaughan And A New Betty Carter Recording

Read "Celebrating Sarah Vaughan And A New Betty Carter Recording" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin


The final Sunday of Womens History Month includes new releases from Bob Dorough, Gabrielle Stravelli, Patricia Barber plus a first listen to Betty Carter's first posthumous recording of a live 1992 concert in the early days of Jazz at Lincoln Center, with birthday shout outs to legendary vocalists Sarah Vaughan, Aretha Franklin, Astrud Gilberto, and Pearl Bailey, blues guitarist Etta Baker and saxophonist Ben Webster, among others. Playlist Ben Webster “Weep for Me" from Ballads (Phoenix) 00:00 Dave's ...

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Building a Jazz Library

Vocal Jazz: 1969-2001

Read "Vocal Jazz: 1969-2001" reviewed by Mathew Bahl


The Dark Age followed by the Renaissance. The tumultuous changes of the 1960s radically changed the American musical landscape. Jazz fell off the American cultural radar, nightclubs closed their doors and record companies moved on to rock. With few opportunities to work and little money to be made, jazz became a music played by the dedicated for the devoted. Jazz singers, who had always acted as a bridge between the jazz and non-jazz audience, found that the middle ...


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