Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page. Read our daily album reviews.

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Album Review

Randy Weston & His African Rhythms Trio: Zep Tepi

Read "Zep Tepi" reviewed by Bill Bennett


Randy Weston returns to the trio format for the first time in over thirty years with Zep Tepi. Poised to enter his eighth decade on the planet, Weston is an elder in every sense of the term. His distinctively percussive attack, yard-wide chords, criss-crossing rhythms and idiosyncratic melodies remain sui generis. Both literally (he's 6'9") and figuratively, Weston is a giant of the music.

He pays tribute to his friend and mentor Thelonious Monk on “Ballad for T," a reflective ...

283

Album Review

Randy Weston's African Rhythms Trio: Zep Tepi

Read "Zep Tepi" reviewed by Joel Roberts


There's no better argument for the notion that jazz keeps you young than Randy Weston. Appearing last month at the Blue Note in support of Zep Tepi, the Brooklyn-born Weston showed that at eighty he remains one of the most vital and creative forces in jazz, as well as one of its most charismatic figures. Zep Tepi is a trio effort that revisits some of Weston's most popular and enduring compositions. While the fare is well known--including ...

302

Album Review

Jerry Gonzalez & The Fort Apache Band: Rumba Buhaina: The Music of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers

Read "Rumba Buhaina: The Music of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee


Art Blakey didn't literally write books, but it could be said that he “wrote the book : first, on jazz drumming, incorporating the essence of swing, extroverted drum solos and some genuinely unique beats that have escaped deeper absorption by contemporary drummers; second, on bandleading, constantly scouting and presenting great (often, younger) talent; and third, on incorporating Afro-Cuban influences into jazz. There could easily be a couple of tribute concerts and recordings to him every year, but as far as ...

301

Album Review

Pyeng Threadgill: Of The Air

Read "Of The Air" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee


Of the Air, an album of original music that cuts a broad stylistic swath, is focused and honest, traveling through various contexts organically. There are several reasons for the honest coherence of this music. The CD is recorded in analog with a core group of musicians, a working band rather than a collection of heavy-hitters or hired guns. Lisa Mezzacapa (bass), Shelly Doty (guitar) and Micha Patri (drums) give it up to tunes that center around Threadgill's voice and imaginative ...

238

Album Review

Jerry Gonzalez & The Fort Apache Band: Rumba Buhaina

Read "Rumba Buhaina" reviewed by Jim Santella


The music of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers serves as a suitable theme for this album by Jerry Gonzalez and his Latin jazz band, since they exhibit the same kind of percussive drive with integrated melody that the hard bop drummer and his quintets shared with us for decades.

It's been almost two decades already for Jerry Gonzalez and the Fort Apache Band, which continues to excite with its fiery blend of Latin flavors and improvised adventure. ...

265

Album Review

Steve Hobbs: Spring Cycle

Read "Spring Cycle" reviewed by George Harris


Who says universities create an ivory tower mentality? Educator and vibes master Steve Hobbs has put out a delectably enjoyable CD of accessible, yet thought-provoking music. Employing a front line of Tom Harrell (trumpet, flugelhorn), Dave Valentin (flute), and Bob Malach (tenor), his lighter than air thematic statements serve as a perfect foil to the percussive underpinnings of Hobbs and pianist Bill O'Connell.

All of Hobbs' compositions are catchy, memorable, and thoroughly enjoyable. The modal “Blued Swings," with ...

308

Album Review

Khan Jamal: Peace Warrior

Read "Peace Warrior" reviewed by Germein Linares


Vibraphonist Khan Jamal leads the charge on the eclectic and vibrant Peace Warrior. The album's content, some of which was originally issued in '82 as Don't Take No!, combines recording sessions from '82 and '89. Released on CD by New York-based Random Chance Records, Peace Warrior places a good amount of its emphasis in introducing and integrating the sounds of the synthesizer and the catchy snap of pop beats into its jazz dance.

The resulting music is novel, even twenty ...


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