Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

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Album Review

Steve Lehman Trio + Craig Taborn: The People I Love

Read "The People I Love" reviewed by John Sharpe


On The People I Love, alto saxophonist Steve Lehman, Janus-like looks back, while simultaneously looking forward. He recruits celebrated pianist Craig Taborn to bolster his longstanding trio of bassist Matt Brewer and drummer Damion Reid. It was once said that Taborn was fated to play better on other people's records than his own. Happily that is no longer the case, but his enduring commitment gives him MVP status in this team, and that's saying something. Lehman enlists his help not ...

1

Radio & Podcasts

Trio Treats

Read "Trio Treats" reviewed by Maurice Hogue


This episode is dominated by trios, perhaps the most popular format in jazz today. Steve Lehman's new The People I Love debuts (with the addition of the formidable pianist Craig Taborn), definitely a must-hear for 2019. Golden Valley Is Now reunites Taborn with Dave King and Reid Anderson (they all grew up together), while another threesome that's very comfortable together is saxophonist Stephen Gauci, bassist Adam Lane and drummer Kevin Shea. They're the house band at the Bushwick in Brooklyn. ...

11

Album Review

Steve Lehman Trio + Craig Taborn: The People I Love

Read "The People I Love" reviewed by Mark Corroto


It is easy think about the shock of the new that was bebop when listening to The People I Love by alto saxophonist Steve Lehman's trio. Not that Lehman plays bebop as it was in the 1940s. It took mammals millions of years of evolution to climb down out of trees and fashion tools, but it has taken but a few decades to progress from Lester Young to Charlie Parker, to Eric Dolphy to Rudresh Mahanthappa. Think Darwin's foot on ...

13

Album Review

Steve Lehman & Sélébéyone: Sélébéyone

Read "Sélébéyone" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


Steve Lehman's critically acclaimed albums have been topping national polls for more than half a decade. It's all the more an achievement when considering Lehman's unique, cerebral and ever-changing approach to artistic creation. His most recent project, Sélébéyone takes its name from this new group that Lehman founded in 2015. It incorporates elements of spectral music--where compositions are influenced by sound waves and mathematics--rap, hip hop, electronics, and of course, jazz. The overall vibe, however, jazz rap/hip hop.

2

Album Review

Steve Lehman: Sélébéyone

Read "Sélébéyone" reviewed by Mark Corroto


The remastered edition of the Beastie Boys disc Check Your Head (Capitol, 2009) has a bonus disc with a live track from Budokan, Japan. A Japanese rapper, MC Poo, raps “Microphone Check" in broken English before continuing on in Japanese. Without the language, he knew what the Beasties were about and also without the Japanese language, we know what time it is. Same can be said for American saxophonist Steve Lehman's Sélébéyone. Sélébéyone or “intersection ," is a ...

6

Album Review

Steve Lehman: Mise en Abîme

Read "Mise en Abîme" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian


Saxophonist Steve Lehman's 12th release as a leader/co-leader and his second one with an octet Mise en Abime is a cohesive work of intriguingly cerebral and dramatic nature. Like the title implies there are concepts that repeat, amplify and fade in the process of constructing and deconstructing the main themes of the album. On “Codes: Brice Wassy" vibraphonist Chris Dingman's sparse, deeply resonant strikes buoy Lehman's brisk and pensive alto that serves as an intro to this exquisitely ...

8

Album Review

Steve Lehman Octet: Mise en Abîme

Read "Mise en Abîme" reviewed by Martin Longley


It's been five years since Steve Lehman's last Octet album, so we're now voracious for more expanded material. Right at the start, his alto saxophone is briefly alone, and then the entire ensemble weighs in, earthy yet finely controlled. Chris Dingman's customised vibraphone is absolutely central to the sound of these Lehman originals, most of which are notably brief and pointed in their attack. At a mere 40 minutes, this is a very succinct jazz album, in the old-time way. ...


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