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MUSICIAN Born:

Ronald Shannon Jackson

I was born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas in 1940. Both my parents were music lovers. My mother played piano and organ at St. Andrew’s Methodist Church, and worked as a schoolteacher. My father owned the only black-owned local record store and jukebox business. On one side of my family is Curtis Ousley (who became famous as King Curtis). On the other is David “Fathead” Newman. I started playing drums in elementary school under the clarinetist John Carter, and in high school under Mr. Baxter, the same teacher who taught Ornette Coleman, Curtis Ousley, Dewey Redman, John Carter, Julius Hemphill, Charles Moffett, and James Jordan. I began playing professionally in Dallas with members of the Ray Charles band, and worked in Fort Worth, Houston, New Haven, and Bridgeport before moving to New York City in 1966

Sex & Drugs & Jazz & Jive: Top Ten Stash Records Albums

Read "Sex & Drugs & Jazz & Jive: Top Ten Stash Records Albums" reviewed by Chris May

With all the transgressive flair you would expect of bohemian New York City in the 1970s and 1980s, Bernie Brightman's Stash Records made its name with a hugely entertaining series of sex and drugs-themed compilations of swing-era recordings. The first was Reefer Songs in 1976. But Brightman's legacy extends much further. There was a finite amount ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEW

Harriet Tubman at SFJAZZ

Read "Harriet Tubman at SFJAZZ" reviewed by Harry S. Pariser

Harriet Tubman SFJAZZ San Francisco, CA January 23, 2020 The electric bass, electric guitar and drum trio Harriet Tubman stands apart in the music world. As guitarist Brandon Ross notes, they are electrified yet based on spiritual influences such as the late Alice Coltrane, the late John Coltrane's wife who ran ...

John Dikeman And The Origin Of The Species

Read "John Dikeman And The Origin Of The Species" reviewed by Mark Corroto

If we were to go searching for saxophonist John Dikeman's spirit animal, we might have to bypass beast for sapien. Let's just say his spirit animal is the father of punk, Iggy Pop. Like early music by The Stooges, Dikeman's sound makes reference to the music of both Albert Ayler and Pharoah Sanders. It's a shame ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Wadada Leo Smith: Najwa

Read "Najwa" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

Trumpet player Wadada Leo Smith is one of the few musicians remaining from the original, founding generation of Chicago's legendary Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians. But he has hardly rested since; Smith's Ten Freedom Summers (2012, Cuneiform) was a finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in Music; in 2017, Smith swept the Downbeat Critics' ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Wadada Leo Smith: Najwa

Read "Najwa" reviewed by Maurizio Comandini

Il trombettista Wadada Leo Smith chiama a raccolta i suoi fedelissimi per una nuova scorribanda nei territori dell'emozione, con la sua tromba spiritata che guida il cammino con saggezza e ferma determinazione, tracciando le linee guida attraverso le quali poi tutti i musicisti saranno chiamati a dare il proprio ampio contributo nella tessitura narrativa dei cinque ...

From Choro to Chaos

Read "From Choro to Chaos" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki

Berkeley Choro Ensemble The View from Here Self-Produced 2017 Like its organic natural wonders, the music of Brazil seems to flourish in different forms and styles of beauty. But much of its music has grown from the root of choro: Born in the mid-to late-1800s from the joining ...

ARTICLE: JAZZ BASTARD

December 2017: Ronald Shannon Jackson, Gregory Porter, Kamasi Washington

Read "December 2017:  Ronald Shannon Jackson, Gregory Porter, Kamasi Washington" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

The holiday season may be behind us, but the Jazz Bastard Podcast keeps rolling on. Here's a look at December's episodes. On podcast 130, we celebrate our fifth anniversary by discussing four recordings by quintets. Rare recordings by Kenny Cox and the Contemporary Jazz Quintet evoke Miles Davis' second great quintet for us and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Wadada Leo Smith: Najwa

Read "Najwa" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith's introductory liner notes to Najwa begin with Muddy Waters, so we'll begin there, too. Wadada Leo Smith was born in 1941, in Leland, Mississippi, around the time Alan Lomax showed up down in Clarksdale, Miss., to record--among many others--McKinley Morganfield, aka Muddy Waters. The Lomax field recordings of Waters and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

James Blood Ulmer: Baby Talk

Read "Baby Talk" reviewed by Mark Corroto

It was a predestined meeting. This collaboration between the legendary guitarist James Blood Ulmer and the band The Thing. Ulmer, who cut his teeth with the soul jazz organists Hank Marr, Larry Young and Big John Patton before collaborating with Ornette Coleman's electric free jazz/funk harmolodic music, expanded upon Coleman's ideas, incorporating rock music with players ...


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