Home » Search Center » Results: Reassessing

Results for "Reassessing"

Advanced search options

16

Article: Reassessing

At Fillmore East

Read "At Fillmore East" reviewed by John Coltelli


A Band of Brothers... 50th Anniversary Allman Brothers At Fillmore East Recently, while excavating at an archeological dig better known as the Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame in jny: Cleveland, Ohio an intrepid tourist lingered long and hard at a find containing the remnants of a long forgotten tribe once known as The ...

8

Article: Reassessing

Back At The Chicken Shack

Read "Back At The Chicken Shack" reviewed by Thomas Fletcher


Back At The Chicken Shack celebrates 60 years since its recording date at the Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs. The same session produced Midnight Special (Blue Note, 1961), though Back At The Chicken Shack would have to wait three years for its release. The label's co-founder, Alfred Lion, later revealed that the healthy sales of ...

8

Article: Reassessing

Kenny Drew and His Progressive Piano

Read "Kenny Drew and His Progressive Piano" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


As a commercial release, the 12-inch LP Kenny Drew and His Progressive Piano has a curious history. It was also released under the title The Modernity of Kenny Drew and contained music from two recording sessions, one held in jny: New York City In 1953 and the second in jny: Los Angeles in 1954. Some of ...

11

Article: Reassessing

Dial "S" for Sonny

Read "Dial "S" for Sonny" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Pianist Sonny Clark was culturally marginalized in much the same way as his contemporary Elmo Hope—both heroin-addicted jazz musicians in the 1950s: at the time, and romantically, a cliche. Both pianists have been sorely lumped into the “Bud Powell school of bop piano" which superficially may seem accurate until one considers the evolutionary continuum of jazz ...

8

Article: Reassessing

New Faces - New Sounds

Read "New Faces - New Sounds" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


In the early 1950s, Blue Note Records introduced new artists in the label's series New Faces -New Sounds. It highlighted such young artists as Horace Silver (1952); Lou Donaldson (1952); Elmo Hope (1953); and Frank Foster (1954). All of these recordings were released as part of Blue Note Record's 5000 Modern Jazz Series, all on 10-inch ...

10

Article: Reassessing

Scenes From A Voyage To Arcturus

Read "Scenes From A Voyage To Arcturus" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


Scottish writer David Lindsay published his A Voyage To Arcturus in 1920. It is said to have influenced everyone from C.S. Lewis in the writing of his Space Trilogy to J.R.R. Tolkien to Clive Barker. The story concerns a character Muskull and his fantastical journey across the planet Tormance that orbits the star Arcturus. And while ...

7

Article: Reassessing

A Garland of Red

Read "A Garland of Red" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Like pianist Wynton Kelly and Kelly's debut recording New Faces -New Sounds (Blue Note, 1951), William McKinley Red Garland performed for years as a sideman before releasing his first recording as a leader, A Garland of Red. Originally from jny: Dallas, Texas, Garland migrated to jny: New York City after a stint with Hot Lips Page ...

6

Article: Reassessing

New Faces - New Sounds

Read "New Faces - New Sounds" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


The jazz name Wynton Kelly is typically associated with other artists' endeavors, such as John Coltrane's Giant Steps (Atlantic, 1959), Miles Davis' Kind of Blue (Columbia, 1959) or Wes Montgomery's Smokin' at the Half Note (Verve, 1965), just to mention three landmark recordings. While he always seemed best cast in supporting roles, Kelly did have a ...

23

Article: Reassessing

For Those Who Chant

Read "For Those Who Chant" reviewed by Peter J. Hoetjes


Luis Gasca was one of the hottest trumpet players in California during the 1970s, recording a handful of albums fueled by the drugs, the culture, and the excitement of that time and place. Though they all featured large ensembles, only one of them allowed some of the era's most legendary musicians to blur the lines separating ...

9

Article: Reassessing

Spodie's Back

Read "Spodie's Back" reviewed by Jim Trageser


Still a teenager when signed to Quincy Jones' Warner Bros. subsidiary, Qwest, trumpeter Derrick Shezbie was nonetheless a veteran on this debut as leader--having been playing in the traditionalist Rebirth Brass Band for several years already. Produced by fellow Crescent City native Delfeayo Marsalis, “Spodie's Back" is a much more modernistic outing than anything ...


Engage

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.