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Musician

Joe Harriott

Born:

Joseph Arthurlin 'Joe' Harriott was a Jamaican jazz musician and composer, whose principal instrument was the alto saxophone. Initially a bebopper, he is now widely acknowledged as one of the worldwide pioneers of free jazz. He was educated at Kingston's famed Alpha Boys School, which produced a number of prominent Jamaican musicians. He moved to the UK as a working musician in 1951 and lived in the country for the rest of his life. Harriott was part of a wave of Caribbean jazz musicians who arrived in Britain during the 1950s, including Dizzy Reece, Harold McNair, Harry Beckett and Wilton Gaynair. While recovering from tubercolosis in 1958, Harriott developed his own style of free jazz independently from Ornette Coleman, although he used a piano-based quintet (sax, trumpet, piano, drums, bass)

Album

Swings High

Label: Cadillac Records
Released: 2022
Track listing: Tuesday Morning Swing; A Time For Love; The Rake; Blues In C; Shepherd’s Serenade; Polka Dots And Moonbeams; Strollin’ South; Just Goofin’ (Count Twelve).

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Article: Album Review

Brian Auger and the Trinity: Far Horizons

Read "Far Horizons" reviewed by Peter Jones


The pop world of the late sixties/early seventies period was notable for its dissolving of genres and for its richness of instrumentation. Once jazz, soul, R&B, blues, psychedelia, and acid rock had found each other, the result was a flowering of bands who enjoyed a sunny heyday of horns and Hammond organ, until the guitar groups ...

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Article: Album Review

Joe Harriott: Swings High

Read "Swings High" reviewed by Chris May


Like many players who are primarily thought of as “experimental" and/or “free form"—and virtually all of the best of them--the Jamaican-born, later London-based alto saxophonist Joe Harriott was also a master of straight four/four jazz and Great American Songbook balladry. Yet in 2022, Harriott (1928-1973) is almost exclusively remembered either for his adventures in Indo-jazz fusion ...

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Article: Under the Radar

A Different Drummer, Pt. 8: Ustad Zakir Hussain Talks Tabla

Read "A Different Drummer, Pt. 8: Ustad Zakir Hussain Talks Tabla" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


Origins of the Tabla The twin hand drum was developed in its current form about 300 years ago on the Indian subcontinent but the roots of the tabla may date to pre-Muslim, Arabia. The name comes from “tabl," the Arabic word for drum, and temple carvings of tabla-like double-hand drums date to 500 BCE. Tabla is ...

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Article: Album Review

Ragawerk: Ragawerk

Read "Ragawerk" reviewed by Chris May


Fusions of jazz and Indian raga go back to the mid-1950s, when the London-based Indian composer John Mayer began experimenting with the concept and, in the early 1960s, went on to form Indo-Jazz Fusions with the alto saxophonist Joe Harriott. Meanwhile, across the pond, John Coltrane became so fascinated with raga that he named his son ...

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Article: Album Review

John Taylor Sextet: Fragment

Read "Fragment" reviewed by Chris May


The not-for-profit Jazz In Britain label is one of the unsung heroes of British jazz. And if it is being sung, apologies, it deserves to be sung louder. While it is fitting that the musicians who make up London's new alternative jazz scene receive a massive shout out, the players who came before them, who paved ...

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Article: Album Review

Dave Green Trio plus Evan Parker: Raise Four

Read "Raise Four" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Bassist Dave Green recorded this set for the BBC Radio 3 programme Somethin' Else in 2004. In the interview included here with the show's presenter Jez Nelson, Green reflects on a forty year career in jazz. It is fitting that this fine record, only his fourth as leader, sees its release in the year Green marks ...

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Article: Under the Radar

Charu Suri: The Jazz Raga

Read "Charu Suri: The Jazz Raga" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


The Roots of Indo-JazzJazz and Indian ragas share common ground in their traditional use of improvisation. They are often talked about in compatible terms, but Ravi Shankar, for one, did not believe that ragas could be compared to jazz improvisation. Spontaneous creation in jazz differs from the complex rhythmic structural patterns of Indian improvisation. Shankar became ...

Album

Free Form & Abstract Revisited

Label: Ezz-thetics
Released: 2021
Track listing: Formation; Coda; Abstract; Impression; Straight Lines; Calypso; Tempo; Subject; Shadows; Oleo; Modal; Tonal; Pictures; Idiom; Compound.


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