All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: Inverted Garden by Eric Benson

Results for "Inverted Garden by Eric Benson"

Advanced search options

76

News: Music Industry

Pow!: Tigran Hamasyan, Wunderkind or Just Good?

Pow!: Tigran Hamasyan, Wunderkind or Just Good?

Tigran Hamasyan—Solo + Quintet Tuesday, February 8th at 7 Le Poisson Rouge When I started receiving emails from Search & Restore about the upcoming appearance of the Armenian piano whizkid Tigran, I thought it best to approach with extreme caution. Our society is obsessed with prodigies, but especially in jazz, words like ...

85

News: Opinion

Kneebody + Busdriver: Why Horns Matter

Kneebody + Busdriver: Why Horns Matter

One of my favorite thought-experiments of late comes from some Darcy James Argue-quilled Secret Society program notes: “What if every time you turned on the radio, everyone from T-Pain to Rihanna to Katy Perry was backed by a big band? What if Animal Collective and Vampire Weekend and MGMT all had 13-piece horn sections? What if ...

89

News: Interview

Sonny Rollins on His Favorite Soundtracks

New York magazine's Vulture site has an ongoing feature called Vulture Recommends in which artists of different stripes (actors, comedians, directors, writers, musicians) discuss their top five works in given categories. In the past, I've done Vulture Recommends with Vijay Iyer, The Bad Plus, Neil LaBute, and Joe Lovano. Last week, I interviewed the great Sonny ...

77

News: Interview

Joe Lovano is the Laughing Buddha of Mainstream Jazz

Joe Lovano is the Laughing Buddha of Mainstream Jazz

I write today in praise of Joe Lovano, a man whom I called in NYMag's jazz listings “the laughing Buddha of mainstream jazz." Ten years ago—on June 2nd, 2001 to be exact—I went to the Vanguard for the very first time, a 16-year-old discovering the music, taken with Lovano's 1992 release From the Soul. (The copy ...

108

News: Opinion

Dance Music and the Joys of the No BS! Brass Band

"Jazz is dance music," Wynton Marsalis wrote in program notes earlier this year. “If it doesn't sound good, people won't want to dance to it. And if you can't dance to it, then it's not jazz." The statement, separating jazz and “not jazz," is the kind of shot-across-the-bow that Marsalis delights in lobbing at hostile parties, ...

235

News: Event

Sonny Rollins + Ornette Coleman at the Beacon

Toward the end of his concert at the Beacon Theatre, the great Sonny Rollins announced that there was someone in the house “with a horn" who wanted to wish him a happy 80th birthday. The announcement suggested the imminent appearance of the mystery guest, but Rollins plunged into his next number, “Sonnymoon for Two," without any ...

135

News: Interview

Pipi Piazzolla: Rhythm Class

Pipi Piazzolla is the leader of the band Escalandrúm, a damn fine drummer, and probably the most omnipresent musician on the Buenos Aires scene. Want to find Pipi? Go to Thelonious and he'll probably being playing, regardless of which band is on stage. Eric Benson: Escalandrúm changed its sound in the early 2000s. What was the ...

94

News: Interview

Guillermo Klein and the New Argentine Jazz: Radio Documentary and Interviews

Guillermo Klein and the New Argentine Jazz: Radio Documentary and Interviews

My radio documentary, “Sounds of Upheaval: Guillermo Klein and the new Argentine jazz" debuts tonight on The Checkout. Listeners in the New York area can catch it on WBGO 88.3 FM. (Or streaming live everywhere!) The Checkout airs at 6:30 p.m. My segment will likely start around 6:39. (I'll post a link as soon as it's ...

104

News: Interview

Pipi Piazzolla: How the Crisis Changed Argentine Jazz

A lot of Argentine jazz musicians have told me about the profound effect the economic crisis of 2001-2002 had on their lives. Pipi Piazzolla, however, was the man who seemed to most fully grasp the crisis's economic and cultural impact. After hearing Piazzolla allude to the legacy of the crisis during one of Escalandrúm's shows, I ...

131

News: Interview

Juan Cruz de Urquiza: Quinteto Urbano and Beyond

In the late 90s and early aughts, trumpeter Juan Cruz de Urquiza led Quinteto Urbano, one of the bands that inaugurated the new Argentine jazz. He remains one of the most prominent players in Buenos Aires. Eric Benson: What's changed in Argentine jazz over the last ten years? Juan Cruz de Urquiza: A new kind of ...


Engage

Contest Giveaways
Enter our latest contest giveaway sponsored by AGS Recordings

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.