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Musician

Harry Beckett

Born:

West Indian Harry Beckett, born in Barbados, brought his own highly personal approaches to the trumpet to the cultural stew of the mid- to late 1960s.

Such is the distinctiveness of Beckett's playing that it continues to be the musical equivalent of DNA, and the elements of it were in place by the time he gained a significant break on record in the band of bass player and composer Graham Collier. Down Another Road, recorded in March of 1969, finds Beckett playing flugelhorn exclusively. August 1970 both Beckett and Evans were working with guitarist Ray Russell on his Rites And Rituals album. As the 1970s progressed the British jazz scene maintained creative momentum

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Article: Multiple Reviews

Jazz in Britain: The Back Story

Read "Jazz in Britain: The Back Story" reviewed by Chris May


Jazz In Britain is a not-for-profit label that curates and releases previously unissued studio, performance and broadcast recordings made in the mid-1960s and '70s by the movers and shakers of the contemporary British jazz scene—proving along the way that the radical new wave jazz emanating from London in 2021 comes from a distinguished lineage.

Album

Joy Unlimited

Label: Cadillac Records
Released: 2020
Track listing: No Time for Hello; Glowing; Changes Are Still Happening; Bracelets of Sound; Rings within Rings; Not Just Tomorrow.

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Article: Album Review

Harry Beckett: Joy Unlimited

Read "Joy Unlimited" reviewed by Chris May


The Barbados-born trumpeter Harry Beckett moved to Britain when he was 19. His first known recording session came in 1961 alongside Charles Mingus. This happened during the London sessions for the Tubby Hayes album All Night Long (Fontana, 1962), which was chronicled in the 2020 All About Jazz article Jazz & Film: An Alternative Top 20 ...

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Article: Album Review

London Jazz Composers Orchestra: That Time

Read "That Time" reviewed by John Sharpe


Issued to coincide with the 50th Anniversary of the London Jazz Composers Orchestra, That Time uncovers a fascinating window on the early years of the pioneering company which are only sparsely documented elsewhere. The first two tracks from Berlin and Donaueschingen date from 1972, some six months after the LJCO's debut album Ode (Intakt, ...

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Article: Album Review

Cartoon: Change Of Meaning

Read "Change Of Meaning" reviewed by Roger Farbey


The Confront Recording's Collectors Series is distinguished by the packaging of its CDs which arrive in a DVD sized metal box. Rather than any cover art, there are instead simple stickers affixed to the front and rear denoting the artist, title and track names. The CD itself quaintly replicates the grooves and track markers of a ...

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Article: Extended Analysis

Naima/Live in Berlin

Read "Naima/Live in Berlin" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Saxophonist Alan Skidmore has worked in many, many different settings during a career that stretches back to the early sixties with Alexis Korner--one of the three 'Fathers of British Blues" (paternity disputed!). That career has included recordings with John Mayall and Eric Clapton, Georgie Fame, Sonny Boy Williamson, Stan Tracey, Mike Westbrook, Mike Gibbs, the Walker ...

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Article: Book Excerpts

Mosaics: The Life and Works of Graham Collier

Read "Mosaics: The Life and Works of Graham Collier" reviewed by Duncan Heining


The following is an excerpt is from “Chapter 9: The Eighties or Graham Collier -The Wilderness Years" of Mosaics: The Life and Works of Graham Collier by Duncan Heining (Equinox Publishing, 2018). All Rights Reserved. The late Graham Collier was a bandleader, a composer and a jazz educator. As far as this latter ...

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Article: Extended Analysis

Wodgi

Read "Wodgi" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Trumpeter Dave Holdsworth has graced a number of key jazz recordings over the years, notably with Mike Westbrook, Barry Guy and Tony Oxley. At the same time, he recorded rather less than many of his peers from that important period in British jazz in the late '60s/early '70s. Instead of the vagaries of a career in ...

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Article: Profile

Courtney Pine: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

Read "Courtney Pine: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants" reviewed by David Burke


Courtney Pine didn't pick up his beloved tenor saxophone for more than a decade, until an album exploring the black British experience demanded it. The multi-instrumentalist eschewed the horn on the likes of Europa, House of Legends and Song (The Ballad Book), his two-hander with pianist Zoe Rahman. “I spoke to Sonny Rollins about ...


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