All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: Gearbox Records

Results for "Gearbox Records"

Advanced search options

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Leon Thomas: Spirits Known And Unknown

Read "Spirits Known And Unknown" reviewed by Chris May

Spiritual-jazz fans in London have had a good 2019. The music looms large in several of the most prominent bands on the city's happening woke jazz scene. On top of that, London's Gearbox Records released Mothership, an on-point album by singer Dwight Trible, who also played a memorable one-nighter at Ronnie Scott's club. ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Buddy Rich: Just In Time: The Final Recording

Read "Just In Time: The Final Recording" reviewed by Chris May

There are few sounds in jazz as thrilling as a big band in full flight. And a big band led by Buddy Rich promises to send the listener's dials into the red. The live album Just In Time: The Final Recording delivers on the promise. When London club owner Ronnie Scott introduces Rich, he dispenses with ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Binker Golding: Abstractions Of Reality Past & Incredible Feathers

Read "Abstractions Of Reality Past & Incredible Feathers" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Binker Golding has been gathering a loyal and impressive following on the London jazz scene with comparisons to John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins. Dispensing with some measure of hyperbole, Golding's prestigious UK based MOBO and MOJO awards, and growing fan base lend validity to his local stature. Like Idris Rahman, Nubya Garcia and Shabaka Hutchings (Sons ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Binker Golding: Abstractions Of Reality Past & Incredible Feathers

Read "Abstractions Of Reality Past & Incredible Feathers" reviewed by Chris May

None of the new, legion improviser-composer tenor saxophonists on London's underground scene are more accomplished than Binker Golding, and unlike many avant-garde players, Golding has a thorough knowledge of the saxophonists who preceded him. His originality is, in a phrase coined by Harold Rosenberg, art critic on The New Yorker in the 1970s, “emblazoned with the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Abdullah Ibrahim: The Balance

Read "The Balance" reviewed by Chris May

Abdullah Ibrahim's discography goes back sixty years, and although there are longer periods between his releases than there used to be, Ibrahim has retained all his grit and jubilance. The pianist and composer continues to make gloriously uplifting music steeped in its South African roots, in a style which still carries echoes of his formative overseas ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Dwight Trible: Mothership

Read "Mothership" reviewed by Chris May

The Beatles' Revolver (Parlophone, 1966), recorded while the band were out of their skulls on high-voltage lysergic acid diethylamide, was the first masterpiece of British psychedelic rock. One of the album's highlights, the sitar-drenched closing track, “Tomorrow Never Knows," still sounds potent enough to trigger a flashback. Remarkably, Dwight Trible's version of “Tomorrow Never ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Theon Cross: Fyah

Read "Fyah" reviewed by Chris May

Over the last two years years the disruptive slice of the London jazz scene has produced an abundance of four-going-on-five-star albums, but even among such company Fyah stands out. Performed by a tuba, tenor saxophone and drums trio, augmented on two tracks, it is a work of majestic proportions, the embodiment of the neoteric London sound. ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Thelonious Monk: Mønk

Read "Mønk" reviewed by Ian Patterson

There is certainly no shortage of Thelonious Monk live albums--there are several dozen, in fact--but not too many such recordings have been rescued from a skip, as seems to be the case with this long-lost tape of Monk from a 1963 concert at Odd Fellow Palaeet, Copenhagen. Lovingly restored by Gearbox Records, the recording finds Monk ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Sarathy Korwar & The UPAJ Collective: My East Is Your West

Read "My East Is Your West" reviewed by Chris May

Indo-jazz fusion has distinguished ancestry in Britain. The music took shape in the mid to late 1960s, when a string of extraordinary albums, each with one foot in Indian classical music and the other in post-bop jazz, were recorded by guitarist Amancio D'Silva and violinist John Mayer. Both featured empathetic jazz musicians (Joe Harriott, Don Rendell, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Thelonious Monk: Mønk

Read "Mønk" reviewed by Chris May

Summer 2018 has seen the release of previously unknown recordings by two giants of mid-twentieth century jazz. First we had John Coltrane's Both Directions At Once: The Lost Album (Impulse!), and now Thelonious Monk's live album Mønk. Both discs were made in 1963. The breathless hyperbole which greeted the Coltrane was unjustified, if predictable, but the ...


ENGAGE!

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaways

Enter our contests with a single button click and win a chance at albums or concert tickets.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: Have a favorite record label or labels? Let us know.

Favorite Record Labels Poll

From legendary labels like Blue Note and Verve to independent imprints, vote for your favorites.

More Polls

Super search project underway

Publisher's Desk

Stay current on website improvements, new features, handy tips, and more.

MORE POSTS | YEAR IN REVIEW

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.