All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: Acoustic Disc

Content by tag "Acoustic Disc"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Tommy "GCP" Emanuel & David "Dawg" Grisman: Pickin'

Read "Pickin'" reviewed by Matt Hooke

Listening to Pickin' begs why it took so long for guitarist Tommy Emmanuel and mandolinist David Grisman to collaborate. The album is not a mere showcase for the duo's considerable technical abilities but is a showcase for Grisman's phenomenal songwriting. Grisman wrote every song on the album except the standard “Sweet Georgia Brown," and the Australian ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Tiny Moore & Jethro Burns: Back To Back

Read "Back To Back" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

In October of 2004, the thirteen alternate takes of this album were discovered by label owner/master mandolinist David Grisman, who provided the material to augment this reissue of the original 1979 session. It was a first meeting for the two best-known mandolin players largely known for their respective work in country music.

Tiny Moore, ...

George Barnes Quartet: Don

Read "Don" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

One cannot help experiencing the warmth and friendliness of this recording. Session guitarist George Barnes could not seem more real than when he bantered with the crowd at the Concord, California's Willows Theater in the Summer of 1977. Don’t Get Around Much Any More was to be Mr. Barnes’ last recording, as he died from a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Frank Vignola: Blues for a Gypsy

Read "Blues for a Gypsy" reviewed by David Adler

With this CD, Frank Vignola turns in an exquisite set of solo acoustic guitar music. It’s intended as an oblique tribute to Django Reinhardt, sort of picking up where Larry Coryell and Philip Catherine left off. Vignola, however, plays only two Reinhardt compositions, “Tears" and “Manoir De Mes Reves." And he starts off with something most ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

David Grisman & Denny Zeitlin: New River

Read "New River" reviewed by David Adler

This set features two eclectic Californians, mandolinist David Grisman and pianist Denny Zeitlin, in a lively and unusual duo setting. The contrast between mandolin and piano couldn’t be greater, of course. Zeitlin’s orchestral playing, with its expansive timbral range and resonating low end, does most of the heavy lifting. Grisman’s instrument has its inherent limitations — ...