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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: Pitfall

Read "Pitfall" reviewed by Alex Franquelli

I love a bit of Remote Viewers in the evening. If it's not in the scarcely busy second to last northbound Victoria Line carriage, I follow their urban drifts while strolling, hands in my pockets, on a straight line: the shortest trajectory from A to home. The things you see while listening to this London-based septet ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: Crimeways

Read "Crimeways" reviewed by Alex Franquelli

There is an almost indiscernible, cynical element in The Remote Viewers' music. It is probably hidden between the folds of its noir aesthetics, where contemporary fables of cops and thugs, the fuzz and hoodlums, seem to flourish in the dark corners of complex rhythmic patterns and atonalism. Or it is maybe the juxtaposition between the nocturnal, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: City Of Nets

Read "City Of Nets" reviewed by Alex Franquelli

From A to B. The language spoken by The Remote Viewers is one that feeds itself with the interferences caused by lines crossing each other at various speeds in a continuous effort to connect the dots. We, the humans, are the thriving beads forever longing that 'B' we, sometimes, don't even want to reach. City of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: To The North

Read "To The North" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

The ongoing saga of The Remote Viewers entails personnel changes that are neatly fitted into a particular program or stream of consciousness. On To The North, saxophonists Adrian Northover and David Petts extend the band's distinct methodology via a four-sax attack, with marimba and a standard rhythm section. True to form, the musicians pursue off-kilter rhythmic ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: Sinister Heights

Read "Sinister Heights" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Reedmen David Petts and Adrian Northover form the crux of The Remote Viewers, a band that gained notoriety via several albums for the largely avant-garde and progressive jazz-based Leo Records. But this double CD release marks the duo's third release as an Indie record label entity. Here, they employ several instrumentalists, including British free-jazz denizens, bassist ...

The Remote Viewers: Control Room

Read "The Remote Viewers: Control Room" reviewed by Nic Jones

The Remote Viewers
Control Room
rermegacorp
2007



This five disc set is limited to 200 copies, which automatically gives it the distinction of being collectable. Although each disc is obviously the work of a set aggregation, there's sufficient depth and diversity in the ground covered for each to ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: Sudden Rooms In Different Buildings

Read "Sudden Rooms In Different Buildings" reviewed by John Kelman

More sparse than previous records (and also more emphatically electronic), Sudden Rooms in Different Buildings finds the British trio known as The Remote Viewers continuing to explore strange scenery. While what they do clearly has a limited audience, they manage to carve out a musical landscape that defies comparison and, consequently, makes for a captivating listen ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: The Minimum Programme Of Humanity

Read "The Minimum Programme Of Humanity" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

This is one of those bands that is hard to categorize. At times, this British trio can come off sounding like a futuristic pop outfit with a Gothic twist. Or a modern jazz group that melds programmatic sax parts with free spirited improv. Whereas the musicians enhance their palate with streaming synths, electronic percussion and subtly ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: Stranded Depots

Read "Stranded Depots" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

The trio known as “The Remote Viewers” continues with their tightly woven sax/synth arrangements amid Louise Petts’ often deviously alluring vocals, evidenced on “The Slow Edge” and elsewhere. “Sequences of Regret” features haunting EFX, sounds of the pocket theremin and counteracting horn choruses, whereas the band also intermingles semi-classical undercurrents with intricately executed modern jazz-based interludes ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Remote Viewers: Persuasive With Aliens

Read "Persuasive With Aliens" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

With their third release for “Leo Records” titled, Persuasive With Aliens, we find “The Remote Viewers” covering David Bowie’s “Jump They Say” and ultra modern rock band, “Portishead”’s “All Mine” along with a collection of originals that earmark this band’s adventurous yet at times cabalistic demeanor. Here, the musicians continue with their three-saxophone hybrid electronics style ...