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Vincent Gardner: Three-Five

Read "Three-Five" reviewed by George Kanzler

The title here refers to both trombonist Vincent Gardner's age and the time signatures (3/4 and 5/4) of the majority of the tracks on this CD. Gardner says the “idea for the date was to try these pieces in a different meter. It's amazing that when you drop a beat and take a tune usually played in 4/4 down to 3/4 its character changes and therefore you respond differently." It's not really that straightforward; Gardner doesn't simply cast pieces in ...

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Let's Tribute Ourselves

Read "Let's Tribute Ourselves" reviewed by Vincent Gardner

Like many other jazz musicians, I am fortunate enough to travel all over the globe and present this wonderful music. While I haven't been playing professionally for an extremely long time--only about 15 years--during those years I have seen quite a bit of change in the world and on the jazz scene. Not that it compares with New York of the '30s, '40s or '50s, but, compared to 2009, think of how much more work there was in the late ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Vincent Gardner: The Good Book: Chapter One

Read "The Good Book: Chapter One" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Although his major claim to fame up to this point has been time spent with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, trombonist Vincent Garner is a very likely candidate for the category of talent seeking of wider recognition. As a follow-up to his debut set Elbow Room (Steeplechase, 2006), this effort not only sheds light on his skills as a trombonist but also reminds us of the musical legacies of Frank Foster and Horace Silver. The Good Book: Chapter One brings ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Vincent Gardner Quintet: Elbow Room

Read "Elbow Room" reviewed by Terrell Kent Holmes

Trombonist Vincent Gardner, an alumnus of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, makes an impressive debut as a leader on Elbow Room, a balanced mix of standards and challenging originals. Joining him in his quintet are saxophonist Walter Blanding, pianist Aaron Goldberg, bassist Greg Williams and drummer Quincy Davis. The band gets off to a light-footed start on the Dixieland-inflected “Doomzoom. Gardner stretches out on his crisp solo and Blanding's tenor passage is gritty without being grating. “Snake ...