169

Red Priest: Nightmare in Venice

C. Michael Bailey By

Sign in to view read count
Red Priest: Nightmare in Venice


Classical Music With A Sense Of Humor, Part II



Priest on the Run was the Baroque quartet Red Priest's first recording for Dorian, released in the late 1990s. It was a thematic affair based on Antonio Vivaldi's flight from Venice at the time the composer was going abroad, assembled from the pens of the finest composers of the Baroque era. For the present compilation, Red Priest turns its attention to the spooky, the frightening, the downright scary. Nightmare in Venice is a deliciously Baroque Halloween-fest if there ever was one. Replete with hissing and catcalls, this disc is a chiller.



Image is not everything, though Red Priest has that quality in spades. This is a quartet of the best Baroque specialists the United Kingdom has to offer. Although Red Priest was praised by Gramophone Magazine, the group also received criticism for basically not being serious. That seems to be precisely the point. Classical music has ceased being fun (presuming that it ever was fun to begin with). What Red Priest has done is to market itself brilliantly to the young and educated crowd able to recognize not only their musical brilliance, but their promotional brilliance as well. Nightmare in Venice is splendid for no other reason than it brings together the more gothic compositions of all of the greatest composers of an artistic and philosophic era. Much of the music presented here looks forward towards Romanticism, skipping classicism altogether.



After hearing Priest on the Run, I thought to myself, "I hope these guys never record The Four Seasons one more time." But times has passed, and at this point I cannot wait to hear their Seasons. I suspect it will be a greater kick in the pants than Il Giardino Armonico (Electra/Asylum 1998). Red Priest is currently on tour delivering the Seasons in a way only they can—with grace, panache, and cojones this BIG.



Visit Red Priest and Dorian Records .

Track Listing

The Nightmare Concerto ["La Notte"] in G Minor RV 439 (Antonio Vivaldi); English Fantasy Suite (Robert Johnson/Nicholas Lestrange); Sonata A Tre In A Minor (Giovanni Paola Cima); Concerto Grosso In A Minor, RV 522 (Antonio Vivaldi); Suite From The Fairy Queen (Henry Purcell); Sonata Decima (Dario Castello); Suite Form Scylla Et Glaucus (Jean-Marie Leclair).

Personnel

Piers Adams

Album information

Title: Nightmare in Venice | Year Released: 2003 | Record Label: Dorian Recordings

Post a comment about this album

Tags

Shop Amazon

More

Read Future Stride
Future Stride
Emmet Cohen
Read Sarabande Blue
Sarabande Blue
Zvonimir Tot's Jazz Stringtet
Read The Dancer on the Hill
The Dancer on the Hill
Steffen Basho-Junghans

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.