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Jazz Articles about Lennie Tristano

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Radio & Podcasts

Pianoism

Read "Pianoism" reviewed by Patrick Burnette


A great big heapin' helping of a certain blind pianist's work provides the anchor for this time's outing, as we look at one disc from six of a new box set and then fan out to look at a little known second-hand disciple of the great man along with two other stylists further removed. Pop matters further reveals Mike's ongoing obsession with all things Buckley.Playlist Discussion of Lennie Tristano's album Personal Recordings (Dot Time / Mosaic) 4:07 Discussion ...

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Extended Analysis

Lennie Tristano Personal Recordings, 1946-1970

Read "Lennie Tristano Personal Recordings, 1946-1970" reviewed by Peter Rubie


They called it the Cool School, but what's in a name?In this case, quite a lot as it happens. The Cool School included musicians like Chet Baker, John Lewis and the Modern Jazz Quartet, and Dave Brubeck. Under the guidance of arranger and composer Gil Evans, it established itself in an unquestionable way with the release of Miles Davis' album Birth of the Cool (Capitol Records) in 1957, though the music had actually been recorded some eight or ...

3
Radio & Podcasts

Lennie Tristano and Lee Konitz: Proto-Cool (1946 - 1955)

Read "Lennie Tristano and Lee Konitz: Proto-Cool (1946 - 1955)" reviewed by Russell Perry


Pianist Lennie Tristano was a very visible participant in the modern jazz innovations of the mid-1940s through the early 1950s, winning polls and participating in all-star jam sessions. Yet his music was always a little outside the mainstream and was increasingly so as he began to experiment with fully improvised performances by 1947. While his focus on low dynamics and long flowing lines has been seen as a precursor of the cool school that arose early in the 1950s, the ...

48
Radio & Podcasts

March Birthdays Including Nat Cole & Lennie Tristano Centennials

Read "March Birthdays Including Nat Cole & Lennie Tristano Centennials" reviewed by Marc Cohn


We've got a nice slug of celebrants to honor in addition to our 'centennialins.' Our best wishes go out to Bill Frisell (playing here with Andrew Cyrille and Wadada Leo Smith), Joe Locke, Charles Lloyd, and Roy Haynes (backing Sarah Vaughan). A very special shout out to Jessica Williams! Enjoy the show! Playlist Joe Locke “Litha" from Beauty Burning (Sirocco) 00:00 Nat King Cole “Sometimes I'm Happy" from After Midnight (Capitol) 07:32 Nat King Cole “The Lonely One" ...

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Book Excerpts

Bebop, Swing, and Bella Musica: Jazz and the Italian American Experience

Read "Bebop, Swing, and Bella Musica: Jazz and the Italian American Experience" reviewed by Bill Dal Cerro


The following is an excerpt from the “Lennie Tristano: The Passionate Intellectual" chapter of Bebop, Swing, and Bella Musica: Jazz and the Italian American Experience by Bill Dal Cerro and David Anthony Witter (Bella Musica Publishing, 2015). World War II and the atomic bomb changed not only the political landscape, but art, architecture and music as well. In architecture, “Googie" or “Ray-Gun Gothic" combined many of the traditional elements introduced by Frank Lloyd Wright almost forty years ...

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Book Review

Lennie Tristano: Jazz Visions & Lennie Tristano: His Life in Music

Read "Lennie Tristano: Jazz Visions & Lennie Tristano: His Life in Music" reviewed by Francis Lo Kee


In 1949 Lennie Tristano (1919-78) recorded “Intuition and “Digression , two of the earliest examples of freely improvised jazz. Though the approaches and content differ greatly, authors Peter Ind and Eunmi Shim agree on the following: Tristano best represents how a non-commercial artist can be “air-brushed out of jazz history as an extremely influential teacher. Jazz Visions: Lennie Tristano and His Legacy Peter Ind Paperback; 192 pages ISBN: 1845530454 ...

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Album Review

Lennie Tristano: Abstraction & Improvisation

Read "Abstraction & Improvisation" reviewed by Nic Jones


Pianist, composer and educator Lennie Tristano's place in the history of the music seems anomalous from the vantage point of the twenty-first century. His music was arguably as iconoclastic as that of Charlie Parker's and Dizzy Gillespie's and equally of its time, but in contrast with that it can come across as colorless and one-dimensional. His influence has been limited to the likes of sax players Warne Marsh and Lee Konitz, though amongst his fellow pianists only names such as ...


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