All About Jazz

Home » Articles » CD/LP/Track Review

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...


Matte Henderson with Marco Minnemann: The Veneer Of Logic

Glenn Astarita By

Sign in to view read count
Guitarist, composer and futurist Matte Henderson is a former student of iconic progressive rock guitarist and founding father of King Crimson, Robert Fripp. He integrates some classic prog fundamentals such as odd-metered crunch chord voicings and wily rhythmic episodes, abetted by his collaborator and all-universe drummer Marco Minnemann. But Henderson spices up the program with muted voicemail vocals by David Torn and Dr. Know (Bad Brains) on a few tracks, amid recordings from prison parole hearings that spark remembrances of the late Captain Beefheart's good- natured anarchy.

Henderson has performed with diverse stylists, including Torn, pop diva Natalie Merchant, avant-garde guitar hero Henry Kaiser and a slew of other notables. For instance, with drumming samples from Pat Mastellotto (King Crimson) and Marlon Browden (Greg Osby Band) injected into the mix, the agenda boasts a mesmeric array of structural components and witty digressions. Henderson's raging single note licks leave a trail of dust within the serious-minded forays and the uncanny composition-based transformations. With former associate, bassist Tony Levin (King Crimson, Peter Gabriel) and others laying down a massive bottom, the program also features a '60s style pop groove on "Bible Camp," featuring a bubbly organ vamp and Gwen Snider's alluring and highly melodic wordless vocal overlays. Here, Henderson conjures a retro and tuneful radio friendly vibe that could have been the opening song for a B-movie.

Henderson states that "Single Cell Shark" was inspired by David Torn's boundary-breaking [guitar] work. Therefore, he launches the piece with a placid acoustic guitar part before sojourning into a maniacal electric-based meltdown, awash with weighty chord voicings, fuzz-toned leads and a diminutive storyline. On other tracks, Henderson summons ghostly apparitions, using or perhaps sampling Eastern stringed instruments and electronic effects with textural layers. Nonetheless, each piece stands on its own as the artist rides the wave of a hard-hitting, yet suspenseful program.

The companion DVD parallels each composition and is often uproarious. Henderson's mosaics are seemingly culled from '50s and '60s film clips, interspersed with cartoons that visually mimic each piece. For example, during the video for "Bible Camp," we see an Ozzie and Harriet like family, possibly infested with post-atomic bomb radiation, and children running around a set adorned with paper machete greenery.

After a few listens it sunk in that The Veneer of Logic defies most progressive rock doctrines as Henderson constructs a façade around convention. Thus, he polarizes the typical model via an artistically oriented impetus, etched in sight and sound.

Track Listing: Whirled; Bible Camp; Ppgf; Can’t Indict a Flower; Myer’s Lane; So Much More (Killing); My Whirled; Come On; Single Cell Shark; Balinese Funeral; Tomatte.

Personnel: Matte Henderson: guitars; Tony Levin: bass; Trey Gunn: bass; Marco Minnemann: drums; Pat Mastelotto: drums (sampled); Marlon Browden: drums (sampled); Tomo Fujita: guitar(11); Gwen Snyder: Voice (2, 5); David Torn: voicemail vocals; Dr. Know: voicemail vocals.

Title: The Veneer Of Logic | Year Released: 2014 | Record Label: 7D Media


comments powered by Disqus

Related Articles

Read This City CD/LP/Track Review
This City
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: March 24, 2018
Read More Songs About Error And Shame CD/LP/Track Review
More Songs About Error And Shame
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: March 24, 2018
Read West Coast Trio CD/LP/Track Review
West Coast Trio
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: March 24, 2018
Read Sun Embassy CD/LP/Track Review
Sun Embassy
by Mark Corroto
Published: March 24, 2018
Read The Pocket Philharmonic Orchestra, Peter Stangel – Beethoven Revisited Symphonies 1-9 CD/LP/Track Review
The Pocket Philharmonic Orchestra, Peter Stangel –...
by C. Michael Bailey
Published: March 24, 2018
Read Lala Belu CD/LP/Track Review
Lala Belu
by Chris May
Published: March 23, 2018
Read "Signal 9" CD/LP/Track Review Signal 9
by Glenn Astarita
Published: October 22, 2017
Read "Duality: Particles & Waves" CD/LP/Track Review Duality: Particles & Waves
by Geno Thackara
Published: June 16, 2017
Read "Witches Stew: A Tribute to Miles Davis" CD/LP/Track Review Witches Stew: A Tribute to Miles Davis
by Doug Collette
Published: October 15, 2017
Read "Peninsular" CD/LP/Track Review Peninsular
by Hrayr Attarian
Published: April 16, 2017
Read "Takunde" CD/LP/Track Review Takunde
by Chris Mosey
Published: October 8, 2017
Read "Honey And Salt" CD/LP/Track Review Honey And Salt
by Jerome Wilson
Published: August 27, 2017