Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

183

Zoot Sims/Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis: The Tenor Giants with Oscar Peterson

By

Sign in to view read count
If nothing else, this album is reaffirmation that Zoot Sims could play any style of music, with any type of jazz artist and play it like he has been doing it forever. At first blush the teaming of Lester Young derived Sims with the hard driving, tough tenor Coleman Hawkins-influenced Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis seems out of place. But here they are in a whirlwind tour of Europe in 1975 accompanied by the Oscar Peterson Trio on which they took no prisoners. "There Will Never Be another You" as much as any track exemplifies the excitement and energy of each performance. The two tear this standard apart and then put it back together again the way they found it. This wasn't billed as a battle of the tenors. But the competition is obvious and lasts right up to the last few bars when each vies for the last word. It was a tie. A bop hymn, "Groovin' High" is as much Peterson's as the tenors'. He plays dissonant bop chords underneath, takes a long solo and then turns things over to Louis Bellson for a rapid fire, breathtaking drum exhibition which drove the audience wild. Drum solos can be boring, but not this one as every piece of Bellson's equipment brought into play.

"(I Don't Stand) a Ghost of a Chance" quiets matters down as the tenors show that they are equally at home with a romantic ballad. Davis' Ben Webster breathy expression rules the day, with Niels -Henning Orsted Pedersen's bass laying on hushed undertones to help soften the presentation. Here and throughout all the performance, these two "giants" feed off each other's ideas resulting in an album of inspired improvisional playing.

Track Listing: The Man I Love; My old Flame; Don't Worry

Personnel: Zoot Sims/Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis- Tenor Saxophone; Oscar Peterson - Piano; Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen - Bass; Louis Bellson - Drums

Title: The Tenor Giants with Oscar Peterson | Year Released: 2001 | Record Label: Fantasy Jazz

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Getting Into Jazz
Album Reviews
Reassessing
Album Reviews
Extended Analysis
Album Reviews
Read more articles

Related Articles

Read Higher Album Reviews
Higher
By Tyran Grillo
May 26, 2019
Read The Unlonely Raindancer Album Reviews
The Unlonely Raindancer
By Matt Parker
May 26, 2019
Read Pyramid Scheme Album Reviews
Pyramid Scheme
By Mark Sullivan
May 26, 2019
Read Mosaismic Album Reviews
Mosaismic
By Mike Jurkovic
May 26, 2019
Read Caldera / Sky Islands Album Reviews
Caldera / Sky Islands
By Jakob Baekgaard
May 25, 2019
Read Baby, Please Come Home Album Reviews
Baby, Please Come Home
By Doug Collette
May 25, 2019
Read Reckless Heart Album Reviews
Reckless Heart
By Doug Collette
May 25, 2019