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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Eyolf Dale & André Roligheten: Departure

Read "Departure" reviewed by Roger Farbey

This follow-up to Eyolf Dale's 2018 album Return To Mind, as with its 2016 predecessor, Dale's Wolf Valley, features André Roligheten on tenor sax and clarinet. But crucially, on Departure Dale and Roligheten have dispensed with a rhythm section. This is not a new format since this Norwegian pair had played in a duo configuration under ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Elliot Galvin: Modern Times

Read "Modern Times" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Following on from Dreamland (2015, Chaos Collective), Punch (Edition, 2016) and The Influencing Machine (Edition, 2018), Elliot Galvin's fourth album is a departure from the previous two. Here he abandons his electronic gadgetry in favour of pure acoustic instrumentation. This was a deliberate move on Galvin's part since the inspiration for album derived from witnessing a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Herskedal: Voyage

Read "Voyage" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Though Norwegian tubist Daniel Herskedal first garnered widespread recognition with Neck of the Woods (Edition Records, 2012)—a sublime collection of folkloric-cum-hymnal meditations with Marius Neset--his unique talent had already won over the jurists at Getxo Jazz in 2004. Two solo albums on the NorCD label made minor ripples before Edition Records came along. Herskedal's next two ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Herskedal: Voyage

Read "Voyage" reviewed by Geno Thackara

You know what they say: nothing opens doors and wins people over like playing an instrument. It can make the most unlikely artist into a star. It may seem like rock guitarists or charismatic saxophone players get most of the attention, but learn to handle a tuba and it can really take you anywhere.

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Herskedal: Voyage

Read "Voyage" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Daniel Herskedal's third release for Edition Records is no less intriguing than his first two, Slow Eastbound Train (2015) and The Roc (2017). It's tempting to summarise the album as “pastoral," but there's a lot more to it than that solitary adjective. Granted, tunes like “The Horizon" and “Molly Hunt's Seagulls" really are pastoral, dreamlike, and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chris Potter: Circuits

Read "Circuits" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Circuits is, stylistically, relatively far removed from Chris Potter's previous album, The Dreamer Is The Dream (ECM, 2017) but is certainly no less attractive. Whilst the earlier album is, generally, more sedate (with some exceptions), this record is full of heterogeneous, unanticipated delights and handbrake rhythm turns. That said, the short-ish opener, “Invocation," with Potter on ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Anton Eger: AE

Read "AE" reviewed by Roger Farbey

On first listen, Anton Eger's eponymously titled debut album shares similarities in its execution with the some of the recordings of Joe Zawinul and Django Bates, and Frank Zappa's Jazz From Hell Synclavier phase. Despite the irritating hieroglyphically devised song titles, there is actually real substance to the ten compositions. For over ten years Eger has ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chris Potter: Circuits

Read "Circuits" reviewed by Sammy Stein

Reedman Chris Potter is one of the most influential and inventive improvisors of these times. Circuits is Potter and keyboardist James Francies, drummer Eric Harland and bassist Linley Marthe

For more than two decades Potter's limitless creativity, effortless virtuosity and vibrant sense of swing have wowed critics, musicians and fans. Following three acclaimed albums ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Jeff Ballard: Fairgrounds

Read "Fairgrounds" reviewed by Roger Farbey

The overture to Fairgrounds, “Grounds Entrance," involves an engaging percussive soundscape leading into “Yeah Pete!," which despite its exclamatory title is a laid-back feast of drums, electric piano and guitar on a similar wavelength to Miles Davis' In A Silent Way (Columbia, 1969). But “The Man's Gone" introduces a funky shift with irrepressibly upbeat wah-wah guitar ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Mark Lockheart: Days On Earth

Read "Days On Earth" reviewed by Roger Farbey

Mark Lockheart's Days On Earth encapsulates the term fusion in its most literal sense. This actually refers to the amalgamation of two different species of music; jazz and classical. It was deliberately organised so that the individual musicians from each respective genre were paired with their opposite number from “the other side." Something akin to footballers ...