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ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter: Radical Invisibilty

Read "Radical Invisibilty" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Always on the farthest fringe of both the downtown New York music scene and the jazz world at large hasn't stopped multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter from leaving an indelible imprint on the greater consciousness. He has worked alongside other mavericks, notably Thurston Moore, Yoko Ono, Cecil Taylor, and Jaco Pastorius. His horns are fiery, disruptive and probing, exultant and brooding, seething and, since the mid-70's, searching as incessantly and masterfully for the right note at the right time. That ...

RADIO

A Focus On Daniel Carter

Read "A Focus On Daniel Carter" reviewed by Bob Osborne

A show with a close look at free jazz multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter with a focus on his output since 2003, and a detailed look at from 2018.Playlist Daniel Carter “Hok Zhou" from Chinatown (Not Two Records) 00:00 Daniel Carter and Matt Lavelle “The D.C. Key" from Live at Tower Records 0812 06 (Atnimara Records) 13:09 Daniel Carter, William Parker and Federico Ughi “Little Did I Know" from The Dream (577 Records) 19:03 Federico Ughi, Gene Janas, and Daniel ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter, Tobias Wilner, Djibril Toure, Federico Ughi.: New York United

Read "New York United" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Like all folk musics exposed to migration, the rhythms shift and drone. The bottom falls out of harmonic structures and then reconstitutes from thin air. Oratorical woodwinds, strings, horns and whistles mournfully proclaim or brightly celebrate. Bringing New York folk music to light, New York United open their self-titled disc with the pulsating “Canal Street," a sonic imagining of the east-west thoroughfare severing Lower Manhattan but uniting Chinatown, Little Italy, and a host of smaller ethnic enclaves along its loud, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter - Matthew Putman - Patrick Holmes - Hilliard Greene - Federico Ughi: Telepatia Liquida

Read "Telepatia Liquida" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

New York-based improvising stalwart Daniel Carter (reeds, trumpet) and other regional artists perform on this 37-minute improv fest, marked by alternating flows and shifting cadences. The album title translates into a 'telepathic understanding,' which of course, is always a positive component for free-spirited dialogues and fruitful artistic ingenuity. Classically trained pianist Matthew Putman is a noted scientist specializing in nanotechnology, and gets the job done here as he comps, mimics and enjoys fertile dialogues with his cohorts. Ultimately, ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter / William Parker / Matthew Shipp: Seraphic Light [Live At Tufts University]

Read "Seraphic Light [Live At Tufts University]" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Do you remember the film The Thomas Crowne Affair? The original--not the 1999 remake--starred Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway, and contained the 1968 Academy Award-winning song “Windmills of Your Mind" by Dusty Springfield. I bring that up because this live performance by Daniel Carter, William Parker, and Matthew Shipp brings to mind the lyrics: “Like a circle in a spiral, like a wheel within a wheel / Never ending or beginning on an ever spinning reel / As the images ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Daniel Carter Quartet: Brooklyn, September 18, 2010

Read "Daniel Carter Quartet: Brooklyn, September 18, 2010" reviewed by Harrison Weiss

Daniel Carter QuartetThe Freedom GardenBrooklyn, New YorkSeptember 18, 2010 If you do not know about Daniel Carter, you are not to blame. For over thirty years Carter has been an New York musician, playing with free jazz innovators such as David S. Ware, William Parker, and Matthew Shipp, but has always remained obscure. Talking with Carter, it becomes clear that he has avoided the spotlight by choice; despising how people in the music industry ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter / William Parker / Federico Ughi: The Dream

Read "The Dream" reviewed by Troy Collins

The Dream features the first recorded example of multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter playing piano. While this revelation is impressive enough, the album itself is a fascinating and endlessly rewarding listen. Ably accompanied by bassist William Parker and drummer Federico Ughi, Carter demonstrates remarkable facility on a half-dozen different instruments in settings ranging from sober to tumultuous.

Opening the album with “This Is the Dream" Carter reveals a piano technique reminiscent of fellow avant gardists Cecil Taylor, Dave Burrell and ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter/Gregg Keplinger/Reuben Radding: Not Out for Anywhere

Read "Not Out for Anywhere" reviewed by Jeff Stockton

Daniel Carter's collaboration with bassman Reuben Radding has evolved from an impressionistic alto sax and contrabass duo on Luminescence (AUM Fidelity, 2003) to an alto/bass/drum trio with the addition of Gregg Keplinger on Language (Origin, 2002) and now to the trio supplemented by Carter's full range of instrumentation and other musicians forming what they call the Large Group. Divided into a two-disc set, Not Out for Anywhere offers a lot of music. Disc one presents the trio in ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Carter/Blumenkranz/Zubek: Chinatown

Read "Chinatown" reviewed by Ty Cumbie

This début recording by Chinatown, an unusual trio made up of downtown's wildly diverse music scene, finds the venerable free player Daniel Carter still doing his thing, this time with a young, unique rhythm section. Bassist Shanir Ezra Blumenkranz's playing is muscular and gutteral, and his bowing is turgidly pleasing. On this outing he also shows off his prowess on the oud. Drummer Kevin Zubek, mostly self-taught, has an unconventional drumming style--spacious and asymmetrical, largely eschewing standard jazz or even ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter/Morgan Craft/Eric Eigner: Mysterium

Read "Mysterium" reviewed by Elliott Simon

An active sound experience, Mysterium grabs hold and forces the listener to hang on for a wild multi-genre ride. Using jazz, drum and bass, blues, rock, funk and some down right nasty noise, extended drum set artist Eric Eigner has collaborated with multi instrumentalist Daniel Carter and stunt guitarist Morgan Craft to produce a transgenerational improvisational engagement. Old head meets new, as Craft, who can make his guitar squeal like the downtown 7th Ave express pulling into Times ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Daniel Carter: Luminescence

Read "Luminescence" reviewed by James Taylor

Daniel Carter is quickly, and quietly, becoming one of the most important players on the free jazz scene. But despite being a thirty year veteran of the NYC music community and having worked with everyone from Sun Ra to Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Carter remains largely an underground legend. Luminescence , the saxophonist’s first album released under his own name, is a series of stunning duets that team Carter with another “downtown” vet, bassist ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Carter/Cook/Kowald/LaMaster: Principle Hope

Read "Principle Hope" reviewed by Richton Guy Thomas

Free jazz, like bebop, is complex intense playing with an emphasis on momentum. This is a simple description of the music that occupies a portion of Principle Hope. The venue where this music was performed is Boston's Tremont Theatre, a regular home for no-holds-barred open-ended jazz. The essential component of any free jazz performance is strong communication between each member of the group, which ensures forward motion. The late Peter Kowald lends particularly keen vision to this ensemble, whose credits ...


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