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Jimmy Amadie: In A Trio Setting

Jim Santella By

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Jimmy Amadie: In A Trio Setting
Pianist Jimmy Amadie interprets each classic, Sinatra-type standard on In A Trio Setting with a crystalline touch and his usual buoyant swing. His improvisation carries the trio along natural paths with a universal sense of time.

The salute to Frank Sinatra is coincidental, but it does represent the range of this artist, who took five years and two more operations to complete the project. Jimmy Amadie has acute tendonitis in both hands. Pretty tough for a pianist. Pretty tough for anyone, as a matter of fact. His doctors have revived Amadie’s career. In a Trio Setting is his third in seven years. This one alone took five years to make because Amadie has only been able to tape one song every six months. The pain prevents more, and the therapy allows him to reach his goals.

Amadie worked with Red Rodney, Mel Torme and others in the 1950s and 1960s, but then his condition required a 40-year lapse and many medical procedures.

The trio performs “I’m Getting Sentimental Over You” and “Here’s That Rainy Day” together in the studio. The other tracks are all taped: first by Amadie, then with bass and drums added. They’re a tight unit. Everything clicks, and the session wins out over numerous obstacles.

Track Listing

I

Personnel

Jimmy Amadie- piano; Steve Gilmore- bass; Bill Goodwin- drums.

Album information

Title: In A Trio Setting | Year Released: 2003 | Record Label: TP Recordings

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