Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

221

Pat Bianchi: East Coast Roots

By

Sign in to view read count
The leadership debut by Colorado-based organist Pat Bianchi most assuredly speaks of his East Coast Roots from its first notes. In the company of guitarist Mark Whitfield and drummer Byron Landham, Bianchi offers an East Coast burn virtually throughout, lightening the smokin' atmosphere only on "Little B's Poem," "Theme for Ernie" and, to a degree, "Turn Out the Stars."

With Whitfield matching or surpassing Bianchi's playing from an inspiration standpoint, and Landham driving the whole affair along at a largely torrid pace, it can be said that on occasion there's a bit too much of a good and swinging thing, if that's possible. Bianchi's B3 stylistic links to Jimmy Smith and Joey DeFrancesco are clear, along with their chopsmeister technical prowess.

The CD opens with the driving "Silver Trane," by Canadian pianist Bernie Senensky, then eases to a ballad pace for Bobby Hutcherson's "Little B's Poem" before heating up again with John Coltrane's "Straight Street" and Jimmy Heath's "Gingerbread Boy." Things slow for Fred Lacy's "Theme for Ernie," the first of two live tracks recorded at a Denver lounge the night before the studio session. "Dizzy's Business," by Ernie Wilkins, kicks it up again, then the trio takes on Bill Evans's "Turn Out the Stars" in a respectful but lightly swinging mode. The album closes with the second live track, the standard "Nobody Else But Me."

Whitfield's work throughout this album makes one wonder why he isn't being heard and recorded more often. Perhaps it's just the glut of fine guitar players on the current scene.


Track Listing: Silver Trane; Little B's Poem; Straight Street; Gingerbread Boy; Theme for Ernie (live); Dizzy's Business; Turn Out the Stars; Nobody Else But Me (live).

Personnel: Pat Bianchi: organ; Mark Whitfield: guitar; Byron Landham: drums.

Title: East Coast Roots | Year Released: 2007 | Record Label: Jazzed Media

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Read more articles
In The Moment

In The Moment

Savant Records
2018

buy
A Higher Standard

A Higher Standard

Self Produced
2015

buy
Back Home

Back Home

Doodlin' Records
2010

buy
East Coast Roots

East Coast Roots

Jazzed Media
2007

buy

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Mar8Fri
Jeff Barone Trio
Bar Next Door
New York, NY
$12.00

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Friendly Signs Album Reviews
Friendly Signs
By Don Phipps
February 22, 2019
Read The Adventures of Mr Pottercakes Album Reviews
The Adventures of Mr Pottercakes
By Roger Farbey
February 22, 2019
Read Free Fall Album Reviews
Free Fall
By Glenn Astarita
February 22, 2019
Read The Largo And The Lame Album Reviews
The Largo And The Lame
By Mark Corroto
February 22, 2019
Read Sun Of Goldfinger Album Reviews
Sun Of Goldfinger
By Dan McClenaghan
February 22, 2019
Read Paint The Sky Album Reviews
Paint The Sky
By Andrew J. Sammut
February 21, 2019
Read God Is More Than Love Can Ever Be Album Reviews
God Is More Than Love Can Ever Be
By Karl Ackermann
February 21, 2019