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Winston Mankunku Ngozi: Abantwana Be Afrika

AAJ Staff By

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Winston Mankunku Ngozi: Abantwana Be Afrika While legions of South African jazz artists left the country in the '60s to escape apartheid, saxophonist Winston Mankunku Ngozi stayed home, and he paid a heavy price for his choice. Expatriates like Abdullah Ibrahim and Hugh Masekela circulated within American and European jazz communities, earning exposure and recognition. Mankunku labored under a regime which restricted his personal and musical freedom, sometimes performing under a psuedonym or behind a curtain. But his 1968 record Yakhal' Inkomo stands as one of the greatest masterpieces in South African musical history.

In contrast to that forward assertion of identity, Mankunku's music has become much more soft and meditative in recent years, with Molo Africa (1998) an optimistic highlight. The all-acoustic Abantwana Be Afrika ("Children of Africa") represents a return to roots, a middle ground for the saxophonist, with ten traditional jazz cuts in a (mostly) quintet setting.

His band brings together heavy hitters from the present day, most notably pianist Andile Yenana, whose firm but understated support recalls similar '60s efforts by McCoy Tyner and Herbie Hancock. Drummer Lulu Gontsana has an unerring sense of swing that regularly adopts light shades of Latin and funk styles. And Mankunku himself sounds calm, self-assured, warm, and articulate. The title tune (with vocals and a melody that beckon "Children of Africa" to dance) has an irresistibly catchy groove; the other selections tend to be more serious and reflective.

Abantwana Be Afrika represents a dramatic return for Winston Mankunku Ngozi, a reminder that he hasn't forgotten his roots or lost the ability to express depths of emotion through deceptively simple words.


Track Listing: Give Peace a Chance (Een Liedtjie vir Saldanha Bay), Ndizakuxhela Kwamajola, Bantwana Be Afrika (Children of Africa), George & I, Lakutshon' Ilanga, Dedication (to Daddy Trane & Brother Shorter), Inhlupeko, Tshawe, Ekuseni, Thula Mama.

Personnel: Winston "Mankunku" Ngozi - tenor & soprano sax, Prince Lengoasa - flugelhorn & vocals, Andile Yenana - piano & vocals, Herbie Tsoaeli - acoustic bass & vocals, Lulu Gontsana - drums & vocals.

Year Released: 2003 | Record Label: Sheer Sound | Style: Straight-ahead/Mainstream


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