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Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh/Garth Knox: All Soundings Are True

Read "All Soundings Are True" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Unlike notated music, where one wrongly sounded note can jar terribly, improvised music obeys no stringent laws. It can jar but it's never wrong. Indeed, the concept of what constitutes music--our appreciation or tolerance for some sounds but not others--is frequently challenged by improvisers, for whom all sounds are valid. Fiddler Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh (This Is How We Fly, The Gloaming) and violist Garth Knox (the Arditti Quartet, Ensemble Intercontemporain, Saltarello Trio), have long applied such a free-spirited philosophy to ...

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OKO: I Love You Computer Mountain

Read "I Love You Computer Mountain" reviewed by Ian Patterson

While pretty much all music is derivative, and to a greater or lesser degree inspired by what has gone before, every so often a band appears that shakes up the status quo. OKO--formed in 2010 out of the jny:Dublin collective Bottleneck--certainly doesn't hide its influences on its debut recording, but its musical paint box of electronica, free-jazz, noise, dub, drone, funk and ambient sounds dishes up a colorful collage that dares to be different. Darragh O'Kelly's dreamy electric ...

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Francesco Turrisi: Grigio

Read "Grigio" reviewed by Ian Patterson

For pianist Francesco Turrisi 'old' music is a redundant term. In the Dublin-based Italian's world all music exists in a continuum. Turrisi's debut, Si Dolce e il Tormento (Diatribe Records, 2009) may be the only example of the mediaeval theorbo--a long-necked lute-- in a jazz setting. Fotografia (Diatribe Records, 2011)--a series of piano trio improvisations--veered between free-jazz abstraction and Mediterranean and Brazilian blues lyricism. For Songs of Experience (Taquin Records, 2013), Turrisi eschewed bass in favor of Fulvio Sigurtà's trumpet ...

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ReDiviDeR: ReDiviDeR meets I Dig Monk, Tuned

Read "ReDiviDeR meets I Dig Monk, Tuned" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Jazz/creative music fans who dig palindromes and anagrams had to wait a long time between trumpeter Miles Davis' Live Evil (Columbia, 1971) and ReDiviDeR's debut Never Odd or EveN (Diatribe Records, 2011). Forty years must be an eternity for addicts of words that spell the same way backwards as they do forwards. In addition to the wordplay, ReDiviDeR's debut announced the arrival of an exciting two-horn, no-chord band on the Irish jazz scene. Inspired by modernists such as bassist Charles ...

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Thought-Fox: My Guess

Read "My Guess" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Thought-Fox is a quintet led by Lauren Kinsella, whose adventurism was already apparent on All This Talk About (WideEarRecords, 2012), an intimate series of improvisations with drummer Alex Huber. In a short time, the Irish singer has garnered glowing praise for her voice--a thing of rare beauty--and for her very personal improvisational style. Improvisations certainly color the music here, and though possible to imagine Kinsella performing these songs as duos--a format she enjoys--the quintet lends greater structural form as well ...

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ReDiviDeR: Never Odd or EveN

Read "Never Odd or EveN" reviewed by Ian Patterson

ReDiviDeR was born in 2007, when drummer Matthew Jacobson gathered some of Ireland's finest creative musicians to give voice to his compositions. Its debut, recorded live, has an undeniably visceral impact. Jacobson's compositions are like fine sketches around which the musicians add their own bold colors, seeking collective form and harmony. Improvisation of a post-modern and thoroughly urban bent is at the root of the music. Eschewing chords and conventional jazz rhythms, ReDiviDeR references the broad aesthetic of innovators like ...

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Francesco Turrisi: Fotographia

Read "Fotographia" reviewed by Greg Simmons

Encouraging experimentation is the lifeblood of jazz. It keeps the music vital and ensures that new voices get to have their say. The minute the music becomes a museum relic, played through a fixed, orthodox interpretation, is the moment it dies an ignominious death. Thank goodness, then, for musicians like pianist Francesco Turrisi, who embraces creative experimentation on Fotographia. This collection of fifteen vignettes periodically employs bassist Claus Kaarsgaard and percussionist Joao Lobo. But for the most part, ...

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Francesco Turrisi: Fotografia

Read "Fotografia" reviewed by Ian Patterson

It would be simplistic to call pianist Francesco Turrisi an experimenter, though his music embraces myriad cultural influences, from his native Italy through the length and breadth of the Mediterranean, straddling the centuries, and imbibing from sources as diverse as baroque, Moorish airs and jazz; simplistic, because his music flows as naturally as a river follows its bed--it is in Turrisi and of him, and it guides him. As on Turrisi's memorable debut, Si Dolce e il Tormento (Diatribe, 2009), ...

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Francesco Turrisi: Si Dolce e il Tormento

Read "Si Dolce e il Tormento" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Turin-born Francesco Turrisi has been something of a breath of fresh air on the Irish music scene since arriving on the emerald isle in 2006. In a short time he has earned a reputation as an excellent jazz pianist, percussionist and accordionist; an original voice. He can be found playing in the ebullient Balkan-flavored Yurodny, or Zahr, a group which explores the reach and influence of Arabic music, and Tarab,a group which blends traditional Irish folk music with a cornucopia ...

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White Rocket: White Rocket

Read "White Rocket" reviewed by Sean Patrick Fitzell

Formal constructs melt into freer passages, sometimes to return, sometimes not. The collective White Rocket traverses the notated and improvised on its ambitious eponymous debut. Trumpeter Jacob Wick met pianist Greg Felton and drummer Sean Carpio at the Banff Centre for Jazz and Creative Music; their easy affinity permeates the performances. With atypical instrumentation, the musicians create a unique sound of imaginative breadth and, as a true cooperative; each comfortably alternates between lead and support. On the ...

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White Rocket: White Rocket

Read "White Rocket" reviewed by J Hunter

Carnatic music--a product of southern India--is primarily performed by small groups, usually with a vocalist accompanied by some type of instrumental soloist; a rhythm section maintains the foundation and the drone during the performances. Although White Rocket's jazz inclinations give improvisation a bigger role then in standard Carnatic form, each piece on its debut disc has a definite direction and structure, satisfying the compositional requirement. And while the band lacks the vocal element, the players are all spellbinding instrumental storytellers. ...


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