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Paul Bley, Gary Peacock, Paul Motian: When Will The Blues Leave

Read "When Will The Blues Leave" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

The first posthumous Bley release since his passing in 2016, When Will The Blues Leave is a true dance of inquisitive equals. Recorded live at Lugano's Aula Magna in Switzerland in March of 1999, Paul Bley, Gary Peacock and Paul Motian celebrate their decades-long friendship and the virtuoso inspiration first heard on the trio's ever-exquisite reunion of sorts Not Two, Not One (ECM, 1998). It is a reunion of sorts, for the trio can be heard on five tracks from ...

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Keith Jarrett: J.S. Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier – Book I

Read "J.S. Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier – Book I" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Keith Jarrett and Johann Sebastian Bach go back a long way. Between 1722 and 1742, Bach composed two sets of preludes and fugues in all twenty-four major and minor keys, written for keyboard; the clavier was--at that time--a broad description taking in the harpsichord, clavichord, and organ. The Well-Tempered Clavier--Book I is a live version of Jarrett's 1988 ECM studio release of the same name. Jarrett followed with Book II (2000), another in a series of six Bach recordings.

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Paul Bley / Gary Peacock / Paul Motian: When Will The Blues Leave

Read "When Will The Blues Leave" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Had Paul Bley, Gary Peacock and Paul Motian recorded together more consistently, they would have been considered among the best piano trios in modern jazz history. The three first recorded on the ECM collection Paul Bley with Gary Peacock (1970), a compilation from the 1960s where three of the eight tracks had Billy Elgart on drums. It would be decades before the trio reunited in the studio, and again, ECM captured the session, Not Two, Not One (1998). When Will ...

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Giovanni Guidi: Avec le temps

Read "Avec le temps" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Italian pianist Giovanni Guidi leads a quintet through a lyrical, mostly original program. The core band is the Giovanni Guidi Trio with American double bassist Thomas Morgan and Portuguese drummer João Lobo, as heard on This Is The Day (ECM Records, 2015) and City Of Broken Dreams (ECM Records, 2013). They are joined by tenor saxophonist Francesco Bearzatti and guitarist Roberto Cecchetto. Guidi's previous release was the collective date Ida Lupino (ECM Records, 2016) with trombonist Gianluca Petrella, clarinetist Louis ...

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Bill Frisell | Thomas Morgan: Epistrophy

Read "Epistrophy" reviewed by John Kelman

When ECM Records released Small Town in 2017, beyond capturing the profound intimacy and musical ability to “finish each other's sentences" shared by the first recorded document of guitarist Bill Frisell and bassist Thomas Morgan in a duo setting, one of the biggest walk-aways was the hope that this would not be a one-off. Two years later, Epistrophy captures another 68 minutes (running literally 34 seconds longer than Small Town) of intimate interaction, culled from the same March, 2016 run ...

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Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn: The Transitory Poems

Read "The Transitory Poems" reviewed by Mark Corroto

The Transitory Poems might be the first improvised solo piano recording accomplished by a pair of pianists. Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn are 21st century masters and descendants from the likes of Cecil Taylor, Keith Jarrett, Andrew Hill, Anthony Davis, and Paul Bley. This live duo recording, from 2018 in Budapest, is an act of improvisatory construction where both contribute to the orchestration, structure, and density of eight pieces. We are certainly not hearing James P. Johnson and Willie “The ...

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Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn: The Transitory Poems

Read "The Transitory Poems" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Perhaps curiously or perhaps purposely for these two inspired alumni of Roscoe Mitchell's Note Factory, The Transitory Poems enters existence with the anticipatory, lets-get-acquainted improvisation “Life Line (Seven Tensions)," before each pianist's creative wanderlust and imagination takes hold and the music becomes a ranging, raging real-time white-hot collaborative statement. Recorded live at the Franz List Academy of Music in Budapest in March 2018, the first collaborative release from Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn finds two of jazz's most ...

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Dominic Miller: Absinthe

Read "Absinthe" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Guitarist Dominic Miller''s 2017 ECM debut Silent Light was a low key affair that focused on his solo classical guitar (plus a bit of light percussion). The sequel features a full quintet with a rhythm section. A bigger sound, but with a similar impressionistic flavor. Miller's liner notes make that visual art reference explicit: as a resident of the south of France he has become fascinated with the French Impressionist painters, admiring their artistic daring. The album opens ...

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David Torn/Tim Berne/Ches Smith: Sun Of Goldfinger

Read "Sun Of Goldfinger" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Storied experimental guitarist David Torn is also so much more: looper, songwriter, improviser, session guitarist, film composer, record producer, and mixer. In his long association with ECM Records he has done most of those things, going back to Cloud About Mercury (1987, recently reissued)--arguably still his best known album as a leader--the group project Prezens (2007), which featured Tim Berne and others, and his more recent solo looping album Only Sky (2015). Production credits include Tim Berne's You've Been Watching ...

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Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn: The Transitory Poems

Read "The Transitory Poems" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

The seed that started The Transitory Poems, the two piano set from Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn, was planted in 2002, when the two pianists played in saxophonist Roscoe Mitchell's band, Note Factory, contributing to Song for My Sister (Pi Recordings, 2002). At that time Taborn and Iyer fell into the “exciting young lions" category, and the experience with Mitchell was certainly formative for both. In the year 2002 Taborn boasted only two albums (as a leader) to his name. ...

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Mats Eilertsen Trio: And Then Comes The Night

Read "And Then Comes The Night" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Norwegian bassist Mats Eilertsen has a large discography as a performer, but his compositional talents are equally striking. His previous ECM release as a leader, 2016's Rubicon, was a composer's showcase featuring a septet. But he has also worked in much smaller configurations, for example Meander (Ora Fonogram, 2017) his recent duet recording with guitarist Jo David Meyer Lysne. This album reunites him with pianist Harmen Fraanje (who appeared on Rubicon) and drummer Thomas Strønen (a fellow band ...

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David Torn: Sun Of Goldfinger

Read "Sun Of Goldfinger" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

For less daring and disillusioned audiences, David Torn's ongoing conversation and debate with the twenty-first century Sun of Goldfinger might sound unnervingly like seventy-plus minutes of tuneless, churning exposition laying waste to conventional form. For the rest, these three uncompromising works create an immersive excursion into an intense creative mind opening itself to all possibilities. Along with absorbing listeners and expecting reductive reactions from them, fellow New York adventurers also join Torn on these mercurial dialogs. Tim Berne's ...


Flor de lis

The Rita Payés & Joan Chamorro Group perform Djavan's "Flor de lis" at the Jamboree Jazz Club in Barcelona in June 2016. Rita Payés: trombone and voice; Joan Chamorro: double bass; Andrea Motis: voice; Ignasi Terrace: piano; Josep Traver: guitar; Esteve Pi: drums.

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