Articles

Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

ALBUM REVIEW

Junior Mance: Jubilation

Read "Jubilation" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Pianist Junior Mance has a bop-based facility with improvisation and a bluesy, “no- nonsense" candid style. Mance debuted his career with this unique blend of traits and his singular voice has changed little over the course of his prolific career that spans over half a century. The Delmark reissue of Jubilation, originally on the, now defunct, Canadian label Sackville, is a live solo recording from September of 1994 in Toronto's Montreal Bistro. On it Mance demonstrates a more crystalized and ...

INTERVIEW

Junior Mance: Eighty Years Young

Read "Junior Mance: Eighty Years Young" reviewed by Ken Dryden

Chicago native Junior Mance doesn't sound like a man approaching his 80th birthday. The pianist, who credits Gene Ammons, Cannonball Adderley and Dizzy Gillespie with helping him grow as a musician, has led over 30 recordings of his own and made numerous appearances as a sideman during a lengthy career. An enthusiastic conversationalist with a great sense of humor, it's hard not to feel quickly at home chatting with the veteran artist. All About Jazz: Was yours ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Junior Mance: Groovin' with Junior

Read "Groovin' with Junior" reviewed by Stuart Broomer

Nearing 80, Junior Mance is among the last still-vigorous performers of his generation, the master of a blues-drenched piano style that fuses bop harmony and block chords with tremolos and funky pentatonics. His biography is also his tradition, including stints with Gene Ammons, Cannonball Adderley, Dizzy Gillespie and Dinah Washington. Mance has visited Toronto for decades, frequently performing at jazz piano bars like Café des Copains and its successor, the recently closed Montreal Bistro. Since 1995 his Toronto ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Junior Mance: Sweet and Lovely

Read "Junior Mance: Sweet and Lovely" reviewed by Derek Taylor

Junior Mance Sweet and Lovely Milestone 2004

The heyday of hard bop was a boon for jazz piano enthusiasts. New names on the ivories surfaced continuously like seedlings after a fresh rain. Along with the acknowledged masters like Powell and Monk were their second generation acolytes: Bobby Timmons, Cedar Walton, Harold Mabern and Junior Mance among them. Like their forbearers these fellows paid their dues as sidemen. A Chicagoan by birth, Mance ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Junior Mance: Sweet and Lovely

Read "Sweet and Lovely" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey

Bobby Timmons, Gene Harris, Junior Mance - these men comprise the Holy Trinity of soul/blues jazz pianists. All three have a complete command of the blues, along with gospel, which makes up the subatomic particles of soul jazz piano. Why is Horace Silver not here? Because he is one of the founding fathers of hard bop, and we have to draw the line somewhere. The three pianists above were making music late ?50s-?60s that corresponded to the popular music soul ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Junior Mance: Music of Thelonious Monk

Read "Music of Thelonious Monk" reviewed by Riel Lazarus

In November of 2000 aboard a ship adrift on the Atlantic Ocean, reedman Joe Temperley joined pianist Junior Mance's Floating Jazz Festival Trio in what proved to be a perfect setting for a tribute to the music of Thelonious Monk. Like Monk, the waters beneath them were capable of powerful swings and torrents, and also like Monk, their music was pronounced amid a shroud of relative isolation.Throughout this live set, Temperley and Mance--joined by the gifted rhythm section ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Junior Mance Trio & Orchestra: That Lovin' Feelin'

Read "That Lovin' Feelin'" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Along with stylists such as Gene Harris and Bobby Timmons, pianist Junior Mance is too frequently thrown into a category of players put down for using the blues and other implicit forms that speak directly with their audience. The fact is, Mance can be a deftly imaginative artist whose best work can be heard on a series of excellent albums he cut for the Riverside/Jazzland logos in the ‘60s. The most unusual of the bunch would be 1962’s The Soul ...


ENGAGE!

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaways

Enter our contests with a single button click and win a chance at albums or concert tickets.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: It's your festival. Who do you book?

Fantasy Festival Poll

It's your festival, you're in charge of booking and you have an unlimited budget. Share your lineup.

More Polls

Publisher's Desk

Follow us on Instagram! Continue.

MORE POSTS

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and through our retail affiliations you'll support us in the process.


MUSICSTACK

Rare vinyl LPs and CDs from over 1,000 independent sellers

AMAZON

CDs, Vinyl, Blu-Ray DVDS, Prime membership, Alexa, SONOS and more

HD TRACKS

Specializing in high resolution and CD-quality downloads

CD UNIVERSE

Specializing in music, movies and video games

REVERB

Marketplace for new, used, and vintage instruments and gear