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Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters: Good News

Read "Good News" reviewed by Mike Perciaccante

Ronnie Earl first gained national attention in 1979 when he replaced Duke Robillard as the lead guitarist for Roomful Of Blues. After spending eight years as the main axeman in that group, Earl decided it was finally time to completely branch out on his own. Though Earl had released his first solo disc, Smokin', in 1983 and followed it with They Call Me Mr. Earl in 1984 (both on Black Top Records), it wasn't until 1987 that he decided to ...

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Ronnie Earl: I Feel Like Goin' On

Read "I Feel Like Goin' On" reviewed by Charlie B. Dahan

On his newly released album, I Feel Like Goin’ On, Ronnie Earl accomplishes an amazing feat: he says so much without singing a lyric. Earl’s new album is ninety percent instrumental and it's easy not to notice--Earl’s guitar speaks volumes and clearer than any lyric. Earl does incorporate vocals on one track entitled “Mary Don’t You Weep,” but it isn’t Earl who sings. He brings in the heavenly vocals of the Silver Leaf Gospel Singers to put ...

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Ronnie Earl: Healing Time

Read "Healing Time" reviewed by Ed Kopp

Guitarist Ronnie Earl has evolved from late-blooming blues axeman (he didn’t take up the guitar until his early 20s) into that rare blues artist who’s widely esteemed by jazz critics. The Boston-based guitarist is an unlikely jazz hero -- he doesn’t read music and he isn’t a master technician. Still, the 48-year-old Earl is an inspired improviser and the composer of melodic blues-based instrumentals. Perhaps most importantly, he seems to feel every note he plays.Earl must have been ...


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