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Articles | Featured | Future

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Nolatet: No Revenge Necessary

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The music of Nolatet's sophomore album No Revenge Necessary belies its laissez faire title. Almost a mirror image of its largely insinuating predecessor, Dogs (Royal Potato Family, 2016), this sophomore effort finds the Crescent city-based ensemble flexing its collective muscles early and often, so the record lends itself to uninhibited dance almost as often as contemplation of its intricate musicianship. But it's a circuitous route the band takes to the comparatively upbeat likes of “Pecos Wilderness." Prior to ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Nolatet: Dogs

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The wit in the name of Nolatet finds a direct reflection in the music they make. Yet together as a four piece unit, keyboardist Brian Haas (Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey), vibraphonist Mike Dillon (Critters Buggin,' Garage A Trois), bassist James Singleton (John Scofield, John Medeski) and drummer Johnny Vidacovich (Charlie Hunter, Robert Walter), create a seamless sound that transcends comparisons to their previous work. No question Dogs is steeped, and deeply so, within the grand tradition of New Orleans, but ...