Jazz Articles | Future

COMPARE & CONTRAST

Condon's Mobs: Wild Bill Davison & Bud Freeman

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As an art form jazz has thrived in a number of different environments, and the school of the music that came to fruition under the ostensible stewardship of Eddie Condon, a man whose abilities as a raconteur were at least on a par with his abilities as a guitarist, amounted to a freewheeling brand of the music which thrived best before a receptive live audience. There was however a whole lot more to it than anything that might suggest, and ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bud Freeman: All-Star Swing Sessions

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In the ‘20s, Chicago was one of jazz’s key geographic streams, and at the heart of the city’s music was the famed Austin High School gang, a group of young men who loved the new music so much they decided to play it. Amongst this group—which included Frank Teschemacher, Eddie Condon, Jimmy McPartland, and sometimes Benny Goodman—was tenor saxophonist Bud Freeman. Born 1906 in Chicago and died 1991 in the same city, Freeman spanned the century, and he spent almost ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bud Freeman: All-Star Swing Sessions

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Swing is one of the most venerated styles of jazz. The capital “s" differentiates it from the more abstract attribute attainable through virtually any vernacular. Age and so-called “innovation" have leavened some of music's sweep. But reissues are instructive windows into why it will likely never die.

Just as it’s easy to forget Swing’s earlier primacy, so to do its pioneering practitioners often fall by the wayside of public memory. Saxophonist Bud Freeman was one of the greats, ...


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